Chat with us, powered by LiveChat ?No corrections or further submissions after March 27 - Study Help
  

?No corrections or further submissions after March 27.

Objective: complete an outline and works cited page for your argumentative/persuasive research paper and make a skeleton of body paragraphs.?

?Directions: After researching your topic, write your thesis statement, outline, and sources. While your outline does not need to be formal, all sources listed should be in MLA format with full web links included for online sources. Please see my example outline below and adjust it to fit your topic and major points. You might have three major points and several sub points, or four or five major points and sub points. Consider this a free-writing exercise or organized idea mapping, and use this outline to help you find more sources and determine the strength of your argument. Remember that each main body point will span multiple paragraphs in your paper, unlike a traditional 5 paragraph paper).?


Sample Thesis Statements & Outlines.docx


Download Sample Thesis Statements & Outlines.docx


Paper Assignment Update 2020- Covid.docx


Download Paper Assignment Updated 2020- Covid.docx


2016 MLA Works Cited Guide.pdf


Download 2016 MLA Works Cited Guide.pdf

?

Do not use “things” in your thesis/outline or paper.

Avoid first person (I, me, my, we, us, our).

?

Example:

Topic: Should organ donors be compensated for donating and how should those who receive the organs is selected?

?Major Points: the ethics of current organ donations and statistics, how the system for being selected works, survival rates from transplants, how it can generate income and donations, how altruistic people can remain able to donate freely, government control

Thesis:?By allowing those who donate organs to be compensated for their loss, donations would increase which would help countless people in need of organ transplants as well as becoming a viable option for people who need more income. Those who are selected to receive these transplants should be those in the most need with the highest success rate at the top, and those with less of a chance of survival at the bottom, however there should also be an option that if someone wants to volunteer to donate an organ to a specific person, they can ignore the list system but cannot receive compensation for it.

?Body Point 1: Is offering a reward system for something that is currently an altruistic system

1. How offering compensation can corrupt the system

2. How it can benefit the system

3. Would it discourage people from offering donations or being skeptical of them

?Body Point 2: How the Federal Government could regulate and benefit

1. A base tax they could add for certain procedures

2. Rules and regulations to discourage illegal organ trafficking

3. Why they need to be involved

?Body Point 3: How often people donate organs

1. Numbers of how many people donate organs yearly

2. How offering payment for organs could increase donations

3. The difference it could make in success rates

?Body Point 4: Currently how the system for being selected works

1. Is it based off survival chance

2. Can you pay more to get a better chance of receiving one

3. Can someone offer to donate specifically to you

?Body Point 5: Why those with the highest survival chances should be at the top

1. If it was first come first served system, organs would be wasted

2. By allowing the people with the best chance for living to receive them, it would be easier for them to pay/compensate their donor

3. Donations would be more likely if they knew the person who received it had a better chance of living

?Sources: List at least 4 of the sources you intend to use in MLA format. Include full web links if they are online sources. Don’t fuss about the indentation of sources for this thesis assignment.?

Campbell, Denis, and Nicola Davison. “Illegal Kidney Trade Booms as New Organ Is Sold Every?Hour'”?The Guardian. Guardian News and Media, 28 May 2012. Web. 12 Sept. 2015. ?? <http://www.theguardian.com/world/2012/may/27/kidney-trade-illegal-operations-who>

?

Egendorf, Laura K. Organ Donation: Opposing Viewpoints. Detroit, MI: Greenhaven, 2003. Print. ?

?

Gostin, Lawrence O., and James G. Hodge. “Global Health Law, Ethics, and Policy.”?The Journal? of Law,?Medicine & Ethics?35.4 (2007): 519-25. Ebsco?Host.?Web. 2 Oct. ?2014. http://web.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=4f506623-33fb-? ? ? 4491-9200-e814b4126641%40sessionmgr4003&vid=5&hid=4106

?

Health Resources & Services Administration. ?Becoming a Donor.? Organdonor.gov. U.S.?Department of Health and Human Services, 2016. Web. 2 Oct. 2015.?http://www.organdonor.gov/becomingdonor/

Sample Thesis Statements & Outlines

Please see the two example outlines below and adjust to fit your paper.?The purpose of the outline is to help you organize your argument by determining your major points and several sub points, and where you will include source material. The outline is also helpful for developing body paragraphs and writing topic sentences. Students who have thorough outlines typically earn higher grades on the assignments.

Sample #1

Paper Topic:?The right to privacy does not include abortion

Major Points:?Parental consent,?sonogram/ultrasound, and waiting period are not a violation of personal privacy.?

Thesis:??The abortion debate has many facets, including strong sentiments expressed by the pro-life and pro-choice sides, but the Supreme Court of the United States has overstepped its reach by disallowing states to pass legislation limiting females under 18 to get an abortion. By considering these types of?law unconstitutional and against the?right of privacy, the?court has failed to consider that the right of?privacy is only an implied?right and that states have the ability to decide these issues under the 10th amendment.? Parental consent, sonograms, and waiting periods should be mandatory before an abortion. Notice that the major points are clearly listed in the thesis statement in the order they are argued in the paper.

Body Point 1: Parental Consent

a.

b.

c.

Body Point 2: Sonogram

a.

b.

c.??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

Body Point 3: Waiting Period

a.

b.

c.

(Continue this format if you have additional points)

Conclusion

?

Sources: List at least 4 of the sources you intend to use in your paper. They should be cited in MLA or Chicago format. Include full web links if they are online sources.

Sample #2 (This outline was written by a student)

Paper Topic: Should unapproved drugs be made available as a last resort to patients with conditions for which conventional treatments are known to be ineffective?

Major Points: FDA Regulations on drugs, drugs allowed everywhere but America, freedom of choice, resistance to drugs, viruses, painkilling, side effects, cost.

Thesis: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has stricter regulations on drugs used in America than most countries around the world, making it hard to receive powerful new treatments. A person should have the choice to allow unconventional treatment as a last resort when other treatments are ineffective, cost prohibitive, or have unwanted side effects.

Body Point 1: FDA Regulations

1. How fast does the FDA approve drugs

2. Banned ingredients of the FDA/ red flag ingredients

3. Why the FDA doesn?t like to give unapproved drugs to terminally ill patients

Body Point 2: Drugs Allowed Everywhere but America

1. Provide examples and their functions

2. Attempt to find what makes them ?illegal? in the States and why

3. Why they are available in countries like Canada and others with socialized health care

Body Point 3: Freedom of Choice

1. John Locke says each man has unalienable rights, extending to a person?s body (protection of life)

2. Discuss why choice is ultimately up to the person being treated.

Body Point 4: Resistance to Drugs

1. Many illnesses have fallen resistant to vaccine and antibiotics like MRSA and Tuberculosis.

2. Resistance as a factor to receiving alternative treatment.

Body Point 5: Cost Prohibitive

1. What insurance covers and doesn?t cover
2. Effectiveness of less expensive medications

Body Point 6: Side effects

1. Side effects of traditional and non-traditional medications

2. Use of additional medications to manage side effects caused by primary treatment

Sources: (These are listed in correct MLA format)

Drlica, Karl, and David Perlin.?Antibiotic Resistance: Understanding and Responding to
an Emerging Crisis
. Upper Saddle River, NJ: FT, 2011. Print.

Griffin, J. P., and John O’Grady.?The Regulation of Medical Products. London: BMJ,
2003. Print.

Nakaya, Andrea C.?Terminal Illness: Opposing Viewpoints. Detroit: Greenhaven, 2005.
Print.

Szasz, Thomas.?Our Right to Drugs: The Case for a Free Market. New York: Praeger,
1992. Print.


Paper Assignment: Updated Spring 2020

GOVT 2305, 2306

Evaluation: This argumentative research paper is evaluated on organization, clarity, implementation of guidelines (see below), and the quality of analysis. Pay particular attention to spelling, punctuation, grammar and format. I do not grade for the opinions you present, but I do grade for the way you present your argument and how you?ve incorporated research (source material) to support your argument.

Thesis/Outline: Create a thesis statement that clearly lists your major points in the order you will argue them. Construct an outline to determine the major points and sub points and where to include source material. A thorough outline should help develop body paragraphs and organize your paper. See the ?Sample Thesis Statements and Outlines? and ?Successful tips for College Writing? documents, which are in the Paper Assignment folder on Canvas.

Final Paper: Write your final draft of 6-8 pages (which does not include the cover page or works cited page), referencing AT LEAST 8 sources (see below), and use correct grammar throughout. See the ?Templates for Introducing Quotations Effectively (and Other Good Advice)? and ?Sample MLA? documents, which are in the Paper Assignment folder on Canvas. You are encouraged to visit the Writing Center before submitting your final draft.


Topic Suggestions: You may use a topic listed below and modify it to fit your research interests. If you choose a different topic, you must get it approved before you begin writing.

1. **Should the United States have mandatory military conscription? For whom?

2. How should the justice system treat those with suspected or confirmed mental illnesses who have committed crimes? (Should they be subject to different or modified punishments? Should they get the death penalty? Etc.)

3. Should donors or their families be compensated for organ donations? How should people be selected to receive donor organs?

4. Should genetic engineering be controlled by law? Should companies disclose when a product has been genetically modified? Should the government enforce warning labels on products whose content has been genetically modified?

5. Is Global Warming real or imagined, and what should be done to correct or prevent it?

6. What can be done to prevent police brutality (both by police and against police).

7. **How can the national debt be reduced?

8. **Does society have an obligation to protect privacy as a basic individual right?

9. **Should controversial speakers, religious student organizations, and ethnic clubs (limited to same-race membership) be allowed on college campuses?

10. How should problems with immigration be corrected?

11. How should the United States respond to refugee crises?

12. **How should the public education system be improved?

13. **What can be done to prevent terrorist attacks against American citizens?

14. Should “victimless crimes” such as prostitution and other sexual activity between consenting adults be free from governmental interference? [This topic can also be used for other illicit acts like growing/dealing/smoking marijuana, but just choose one victimless crime to focus on.]

15. **Does the American system of criminal justice need reform (i.e. mandatory sentencing, reduced sentences for non-violent crimes, improved prison conditions, private prison)?

16. To what extent should individuals be able to ask doctors in terminating their own lives (euthanasia)?

17. **What role should the federal government take in dealing with the problem of AIDS, homelessness, or other widespread social, medical, and economical problems? (Pick only one problem)

18. **How can poverty and drug dependence be reduced in Appalachia?

19. Should unapproved drugs be made available as a last resort to patients with conditions for which conventional treatments are known to be ineffective? Should citizens have access to medication approved in other countries?

20. Should the federal government provide health care for all citizens who cannot afford their own? What are the merits for universal healthcare and how would you change the Affordable Care Act?

21. **Should those receiving unemployment benefits be subjected to alcohol and drug testing?

22. Should the government hire those who are unemployed to complete essential jobs instead of giving them unemployment benefits (think Works Progress Administration)?

**-A topic I would love to read more about!

Note: I’m happy to help you with your paper. Please see me if you get stuck at any point in the writing process. Do not submit an essay that you have written in another class.


Guidelines:

1. The final paper should have a cover page with the title, your name, course number and the date of submission correctly formatted according to MLA or Chicago guidelines. Do not add this information to the second page of your paper (where you actually begin writing). Both your cover page and your works cited should be in the same document/file with your paper. If you don?t know how to include these in a single document, see me and read the Sample MLA paper.

2. 1 inch margins, 12 pt. Times New Roman font only, double-spaced. The entire paper must be formatted according to MLA or Chicago guidelines, including margins and page numbers.

3. In-text (parenthetical) citations should be made in MLA or Chicago format. Remember, it is always better to err on the side of over-citing than under-citing. Any time information is borrowed, you must cite, even if you do not directly quote the source. Each citation should include the author and the page number when available. You must provide full web links on the works cited page for each online source. Not including the introduction and conclusion, you should aim to cite at least twice per paragraph. Choose either MLA or Chicago, but do not use both formats simultaneously.

4. References should be included on an attached page in MLA or Chicago format titled ?Works Cited?. You should cite no less than 8 sources.

5. Online articles obtained from JSTOR or similar databases accessible from the college library, and news sources such as The Washington Post count as an online source if found online. Please note the database/online source where you obtained these references in your Works Cited page and include full web links. Because of Covid-19 precautions, I am not requiring you to check out books from the library this semester. At least four of your eight required sources must be academic articles/peer-reviewed studies, etc. that come from one of our academic databases. Note: JStor is one of the best databases for GOVT & HIST classes.

6. Do not write in first person (I, me, my, we, us, our) or second person (you, your). Write from a third person perspective, unless it is a brief anecdote.

7. Do not rely on asking unanswered questions in your paper to establish your argument (questions that you pose to your reader and do not answer yourself)- it is weak. Instead, phrase your major points as affirmative statements. Points will be deducted per use of question.

8. Do not use block format quotations. A block quote in either MLA or Chicago format is used when the quotation is more than four full lines of text. Your paper is too short to warrant the use of block quotes. Points will be deducted per use of block quote. If you choose to include a block quote, then you must compensate by writing a longer paper per line of indented text.


Source Requirements: (8 sources minimum)

1. No less than 4 scholarly articles. These can be found in the library?s database, which you can access via Cougarweb. Because of limited access to the library, book sources are encouraged but no longer required. JSTOR is one of the easiest to navigate and best databases for this course.

2. The remaining 4 sources may be any book, periodical, audio, video, interview, etc. and online.

3. Acceptable online sources include blogs, official newspaper/magazine websites, and online database sources, such as those found in EBSCO, JSTORE, ACADEMIC SEARCH COMPLETE.

******Under no circumstances shall you use: helium.com, findarticles.com, 123paper.com, associatedcontent.com, Wikipedia.com, about.com, ehow.com, observer.com, livestrong.com, theodyssey.com, etc. These are sites with little editorial oversight and are not reliable. If you have a question on whether or not you may use a source, please email me. Full web links should be included on the Works Cited page for all online sources.

4. Dictionaries, encyclopedias, textbooks, and American documents (i.e. Constitution) MAY be used but they DO NOT count as official sources for this paper.


Submission:

The final draft will be submitted electronically via Canvas on turnitin.com. Please only submit a .doc or .docx format.

(Scroll down for Guidelines/Rubric)

Paper Checklist:

GOVT 2305 & 2306

General Formatting Guidelines: (6 points each)

______The paper should have a cover page with the title, author?s name, course number and the date of submission correctly formatted according to MLA or Chicago guidelines.

_______The entire paper must be formatted according to MLA or Chicago guidelines, including margins and page numbers. Only one inch margins, and 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri font should be used.

______ Parenthetical citations and the works cited list should follow MLA or Chicago. Each citation should include the author and the page number when possible.

______ The student has written the minimum page requirement, not including the cover page or works cited page.

______Follows all source guidelines and includes full web links for online sources.

______Each source is introduced, and the source?s credibility or expertise is established to the reader,

Organization: (5 points each)

______ Contains a clearly identifiable introduction, body, and conclusion.

______Introduction hooks the reader and conveys the significance of the topic.
______ States a clear thesis and structures paragraphs chronologically. Lists major points in thesis statement.
______ Develops only one central idea with focused topic sentences in each paragraph.
______ Uses coherent transitions between paragraphs and major points.

Content: (3 points each)

______ Provides logical, accurate, and sufficient level of detail to make complete argument. Critically evaluates/responds to the topic in an analytical, persuasive manner.

______ Avoids plagiarism; skillfully paraphrases and quotes when necessary. Provides necessary citations.

______ Avoids first person (I, me, my, we, us, our) & second person (you, your).

______ Avoids block quotes and unnecessary wording to achieve length.

_______Avoids use of questions to construct an argument.

_______ Replaced any small, basic wording with more complex vocabulary. Does not use the word ?thing? and other filler words.
_______Employs a mature, college-level vocabulary (varied, sophisticated word choice).

Mechanics: (6 points each)

_______ Avoids errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, paragraphing, verb tenses, subject-verb agreement, and word choice.
_______Avoids errors like fused sentences and sentence fragments.
_______Demonstrates mastery of clause coordination and connection.

Revision

_______ A printed a copy of the paper was read out loud and checked for errors.

_______ Someone else proofread the paper
_______ Student has consulted the Writing Center and will receive extra credit points.

Name:

Section:

Paper Rubrics:

GOVT 2305 & 2306

General Formatting Guidelines: (6 points each)

______The paper should have a cover page with the title, author?s name, course number and the date of submission correctly formatted according to MLA or Chicago guidelines.

_______The entire paper must be formatted according to MLA or Chicago guidelines, including margins and page numbers. Only one inch margins, and 12 point Times New Roman or Calibri font should be used.

______ Parenthetical citations and the works cited list should follow MLA or Chicago. Each citation should include the author and the page number when possible.

______ The student has written the minimum page requirement, not including the cover page or works cited page.

______Follows all source guidelines and includes full web links for online sources.

______Each source is introduced, and the source?s credibility or expertise is established to the reader,

Organization: (5 points each)

______ Contains a clearly identifiable introduction, body, and conclusion.

______Introduction hooks the reader and conveys the significance of the topic.
______ States a clear thesis and structures paragraphs chronologically. Lists major points in thesis statement.
______ Develops only one central idea with focused topic sentences in each paragraph.
______ Uses coherent transitions between paragraphs and major points.

Content: (3 points each)

______ Provides logical, accurate, and sufficient level of detail to make complete argument. Critically evaluates/responds to the topic in an analytical, persuasive manner.

______ Avoids plagiarism; skillfully paraphrases and quotes when necessary. Provides necessary citations.

______ Avoids first person (I, me, my, we, us, our) & second person (you, your).

______ Avoids block quotes and unnecessary wording to achieve length.

_______Avoids use of questions to construct an argument.

_______ Replaced any small, basic wording with more complex vocabulary. Does not use the word ?thing? and other filler words.
_______Employs a mature, college-level vocabulary (varied, sophisticated word choice).

Mechanics: (6 points each)

_______ Avoids errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, paragraphing, verb tenses, subject-verb agreement, and word choice.
_______Avoids errors like fused sentences and sentence fragments.
_______Demonstrates mastery of clause coordination and connection.

Total Grade: _______

Comments:

MLA Works Cited Documentation

Updated to reflect 2016 revisions

Note: These citations serve as examples of how to format entries on Works Cited pages of student

research papers. These examples may or may not be actual published literary works, and you should not

be disappointed if the Internet Web site URLs are not functional. Again, this page is simply a set of

examples to help you format a paper written in MLA style.

When creating your Works cited page, remember to:

? Begin the Works Cited on a new page, but number consecutively (i.e., if the last page of your essay is
page 3, the Works Cited is page 4).

? Alphabetize each entry by first letter in the citation, usually the author?s last name.
o However, if a work has no author, begin by alphabetizing the first key word in its title,

ignoring articles (a, an, the).

? Italicize the titles of all independent, stand-alone works, such as books, magazines, films, newspapers,
works of art, titles of CDs, titles of TV shows, and epic poems.

? Put quotation marks around any work that is part of a larger whole, such as poems, short stories,
articles, specific episodes of TV shows, specific songs on CDs, and essays.

o If an independent, stand-alone work, such as a play, is anthologized, use italics for both the
title of the work and the title of the anthology. (For examples, see ?Work in an anthology or

collection? below.)

? Indent all lines in the citation after the first by ? inch. This is called a ?hanging indent,? and you can
find instructions using the Help function.

? Double-space the entire Works Cited page, and do not include extra line spaces anywhere. The
examples below are single-spaced only to save space on this handout.

Major Changes to the 8
th

edition of MLA?Web Sources:

? The URL (without http:// or https://) is now normally given for a Web source. Angle brackets (<
and >) are not used around it.

? If a DOI is available, list it in place of the URL. If one is not available, list the URL as above.

? Placeholders for unknown information like n.d. (?no date?) are no longer used.

? Access dates for online materials are not required, but are especially encouraged when there is no
copyright date listed on a website. Your professor may require the access date; in which case, it is

written Accessed 10 Oct. 2016 and is the last item in the citation.

Type of

Citation

Example of Citation

Books, Anthologies, and Collections

Book (one

author)

Gorman, Elizabeth. Prairie Women. Yale UP, 1986.

Book (two

authors)

Caper, Charles, and Lawrence T. Teamos. How to Camp. Doubleday, 1986.

Book (three or

more authors)

Ellis, Doris, et al. History of Japan. Harcourt, 1989.

Book with no

author

Encyclopedia of Indiana. Somerset, 1993.

E-book,

Kindle, etc.

MLA Handbook. 8th ed., e-book, Modern Language Association of America, 2016.

MLA Handbook. 8th ed., Kindle ed., Modern Language Association of America, 2016.

Book (one

editor)

Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. Edited by Margaret Smith, Oxford UP, 1998.

Book (two

editors)

The Oregon Trail. Edited by David J. Lockhard and Charles Heimler, Bonanza, 1992.

Book (three or

more editors)

Encyclopedia of Animal Life. Edited by Carlson, David, et al., Houghton, 1985.

Book

(corporate

author)

American Medical Association. The American Medical Association Encyclopedia of

Medicine. Edited by Charles B. Clayman, Random, 1989.

Book

(translated,

emphasis on

original

authorship)

Derrida, Jacques. The Beast and the Sovereign. Translated by Geoffrey Bennington, U

of Chicago P, 2009.

Book

(translated,

emphasis on

translation)

Bennington, Geoffrey, translator. The Beast and the Sovereign. By Jacques Derrida, U

of Chicago P, 2009.

Book

available

online

Keats, John. Poetical Works. 1884. Bartleby.com: Great Books Online. Edited by

Steven van Leeuwen, May 1998, www.worldcat.org/title/bartlebycom-great-

books-online/oclc/43887199.

Introduction,

preface,

foreword, or

afterword to a

book

Doctorow, E. L. Introduction. Sister Carrie, by Theodore Dreiser, Bantam, 1985. pp. v-

xi.

Elliott, Emory. Afterword. The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair, Signet, 1990, pp. 342-50.

Work in an

anthology or

collection

(incl. poems,

short stories,

plays, novels,

and essays)

Frost, James. ?Strawberries in a Field.? Perrine?s Literature: Structure, Sound, and

Sense, edited by Thomas R. Arp and Greg Johnson, Heinle and Heinle, 2002, p.

23.

Hansberry, Lorraine. A Raisin in the Sun. Black Theater: A Twentieth Century

Collection of the Work of Its Best Playwrights, edited by Lindsay Patterson,

Dodd, 1971, pp. 221-76.

Work in an

anthology or

collection of

multiple

volumes

Stowe, Harriet Beecher. “Sojourner Truth, the Libyan Sibyl.” 1863. The Heath

Anthology of American Literature. Edited by Paul Lauter, et al, 5th ed., vol. 1,

Heath, 1994, pp. 2425-33.

Work in an

anthology

(translated)

Allende, Isabel. ?Toad?s Mouth.? Translated by Margaret Sayers Peden. A Hammock

beneath the Mangoes: Stories from Latin America, edited by Thomas Colchie,

Plume, 1992, pp. 83-88.

Government

publication

United States, Congress, Senate, Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Hearing

on the Geopolitics of Oil. Government Printing Office, 2007, 110th Congress,

1st session, Senate Report 111-8.

Book, later

edition

Blamires, Harry. The New Bloomsday Book: A Guide through Ulysses. 3rd

ed., Routledge, 1996.

Reference Works

Encyclopedia

article

(signed)

Barnridge, Thomas H. ?Baseball.? World Book Encyclopedia, 2001.

Encyclopedia

article

(unsigned)

“Egypt.” The New Encyclopedia Britannica, 2002.

Encyclopedia

article (online)

“Egypt.” Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Version 97.1.1, Mar. 1997, Encyclopedia

Britannica, 29 Feb. 2000, www.search.eb.com/. Accessed 29 Sept. 2016.

Articles

Magazine

article

Cannon, Angie. “Just Saying No to Tests.” U.S. News & World Report, Oct. 1999, p. 34.

Magazine

article (online

news

subscription

service)

Cannon, Angie. “Just Saying No to Tests.” U.S. News & World Report, Oct. 1999, p. 34.

SIRS Researcher, www.sirsresearcher.com.

Web

magazine

article

Bernstein, Mark. “10 Tips on Writing the Living Web.” A List Apart: For People Who

Make Websites, 16 Aug. 2002, alistapart.com/article/writeliving.

Magazine

article in print

archived in an

error: Content is protected !!