Chat with us, powered by LiveChat #2 24-Hour Diet Analysis Follow the same directio - Study Help
  


#2 24-Hour Diet Analysis

Follow the same directions and use the same subheading as in the #1 24_Hour Diet Analysis.

Add the following additional subheadings to this second report and include as much information that applies to each section below for this paper.


Social History:

? Discuss the reasons why the foods you ate were selected.

? How often you eat away from home? RARELY

? Do you eat fast foods or organic foods? more organic than fast food

? Who does the cooking/shopping in the home? my mom, sometimes me/ my husband and I buy the food

? Does anyone in the home have a special diet that everyone follows? NO

? Number of meal/snacks per day? 3 meals/ 2 or 3 snacks per day

? Does school or work schedules influence the foods selected? NO

? Working or going to school? Number of hours/week? Regular hours? I go to school 22 hours a week

? Do you exercise? How often and which kind of exercise? 2 times a week/ Peloton bike

? Do you need more or less calories to maintain your ideal weight?

? Do you smoke? Drink alcohol? How often on a typical week? No


Special Dietary Considerations I don?t have any special dietary considerations

? Give examples of any dietary consideration due to: medications, cultural, lactose intolerance, low-fat, low-calorie, food allergies, intolerances such as gluten, vegetarian, or religious observances that restrict certain foods this person eats.

? Include any food(s) from each of the food groups that you dislike to eat.


Medical History: No medical history

? List all pertinent medical information that is affected by nutrition, including family history of disease, surgeries that relate to the digestive system (ex. gallbladder, stomach, thyroid, etc.), medications, smoking, supplements, and OTC and prescription drugs.

? State the BMI and comment on the findings. Calculate Your BMI – Standard BMI Calculator (nih.gov). Are you on target, under or overweight according to your BMI? I am on target BMI=24.8 normal weight 18.5-24.9


Dental History:

Discuss all pertinent information of the dental/oral history as it relates to diet and food

choice including:

? Oral hygiene status (healthy, gingivitis, periodontitis) healthy

? Periodontal disease?include description of gingival/periodontal condition No

? Orthodontics No

? Number of restorations; how many years/months since the last restoration was done? 4 restauration 2 years ago

? Does your dental health affect nutritional intake (the foods you eat)? Yes , Argue the question Missing teeth? 4 for ortho treatment

? Does your nutritional intake have an impact on the oral health? Yes, maybe it is the cause of some cavities


Comparison of #1 Personal 24-Hour Diet Analysis to the #2 Personal 24-Hour Diet Analysis

? State whether the #2 diet analysis improved, worsen or stayed the same in comparison to the #1 diet analysis.

? Be specific with food intake of specific food groups serving amounts whether they improved or worsen.

? Comment on the comparison of the intake with MyPlate. How does your intake compare with the recommendations?

? What specific foods or beverages were consumed that helped you meet the recommendations?

? Which specific foods or beverages can be modified for a healthier diet? Examples. ?I will eliminate sodas from my diet?. ?I will only eat dessert two times a week instead of every day?. ?I will replace sodas at lunch with unsweet ice tea or water?.

? State what you need to do to improve your diet at this point. Be specific about which foods/serving amounts you would add to your diet to meet the recommended amount of servings. Don?t generalize, be specific. For example, do not say, ?I need to improve my intake of vegetables?. Instead say, ?I will add 1 cup of strawberries or blueberries for breakfast?; ?I will add 3 ounces of fish or chicken for dinner three times a week?.

? How can your food intake improve? Provide specific and realistic recommendations.

This is similar to the one above, but serving amounts are not needed. You can discuss other things like these examples, ?I will reduce my sodium intake by eliminating soy sauce or using a low-salt brand?; ?I will increase my fiber intake by eating??; ?I will reduce my rice portions at dinner to one cup instead of three cups.? ?I will grill chicken instead of deep frying it?.

? Explain factors from the medical and dental history that may require modification in your food intake.


Conclusions:

? Summarize your main comments on how to improve your dietary intake.

? How successful do you think you will be to make the changes you want to make in your diet?

? What strategies will you use to make the changes you want to make in your diet?


Create a Menu for One Day (on a separate page):

? From the findings in your report and the servings recommended for each food group

from MyPlate Plan, construct a realistic menu for one day for breakfast, lunch, and

dinner, and snacks that can meet all or most of your nutrient needs.

? Make sure this menu has the recommended amount of servings from the food groups

that was recommended for you in MyPlate Plan.

You’re a
MyPlate Pro!

Hey Heiddy!
Here are your results.

Completed: 6-March-2022

Fruits

How often do you eat from the
Fruit Group? Never/Rarely Occasionally

Your Answer
Often/Always
Recommended

Vegetables

How often do you eat from the
Vegetable Group? Never/Rarely Occasionally Often/Always

Your Answer

How often do you eat dark green
vegetables? Never/Rarely Occasionally

Your Answer
Often/Always
Recommended

How often do you eat red and
orange vegetables? Never/Rarely Occasionally Often/Always

Your Answer

How often do you eat beans,
peas, and lentils? Never/Rarely Occasionally

Your Answer
Often/Always
Recommended

Grains

How often do you eat from the
Grains Group? Never/Rarely Occasionally

Your Answer
Often/Always
Recommended

How often do you eat whole
grains? Never/Rarely Occasionally

Your Answer
Often/Always
Recommended

Protein Foods

How often do you eat from the
Protein Foods Group? Never/Rarely Occasionally Often/Always

Your Answer

How often do you eat seafood per
week? Never Once per week

Your Answer
2+ times per week

Recommended

How often do you eat other
Protein Foods? Never/Rarely Occasionally

Your Answer
Often/Always
Recommended

Dairy You’re doing great!

How often do you eat from the
Dairy Group? Never/Rarely Occasionally Often/Always

Your Answer

How often do you drink low-fat
(1%) or fat-free (0%) dairy milk? Never/Rarely Occasionally Often/Always

Your Answer

How often do you drink lactose-
free milk or fortified soy
beverages (soymilk)?

Never/Rarely
Your Answer

Occasionally Often/Always
Recommended

The benefits of healthy eating add up over time, bite by bite. Small changes matter.
Start Simple with MyPlate.

A healthy eating routine is important at every stage of life and can have positive effects that add up over time. It?s
important to eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, grains, protein foods, and dairy or fortified soy alternatives. When
deciding what to eat or drink, choose options that are full of nutrients. Make every bite count.

Food Group Amounts for 1,800 Calories a Day for Ages 14+ Years

Fruits

11/2 cups

Focus on whole fruits

Focus on whole fruits that
are fresh, frozen, canned, or
dried.

Vegetables

21/2 cups

Vary your veggies

Choose a variety of colorful
fresh, frozen, and canned
vegetables?make sure to
include dark green, red, and
orange choices.

Grains

6 ounces

Make half your grains
whole grains

Find whole-grain foods by
reading the Nutrition Facts
label and ingredients list.

Protein

5 ounces

Vary your protein
routine

Mix up your protein foods to
include seafood; beans, peas,
and lentils; unsalted nuts and
seeds; soy products; eggs;
and lean meats and poultry.

Dairy

3 cups

Move to low-fat or fat-free
dairy milk or yogurt
(or lactose-free dairy or
fortified soy versions)

Look for ways to include dairy
or fortified soy alternatives at
meals and snacks throughout
the day.

Limit

Choose foods and beverages with less
added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium.
Limit:
? Added sugars to <45 grams a day.

? Saturated fat to <20 grams a day.

? Sodium to <2,300 milligrams a day.

Activity Be active your way:
Children 6 to 17 years old should move
60 minutes every day. Adults should be
physically active at least 21/2 hours per week.

Food and Nutrition Service
United States Department of Agriculture

MyPlate Plan
Write down the foods you ate today and track your small changes, bite by bite.

Write down your food
choices for each food group. Food group targets for an 1,800-calorie* pattern are:

11/2 cups
1 cup of fruits counts as
? 1 cup raw or cooked fruit; or
? 1/2 cup dried fruit; or
? 1 cup 100% fruit juice.

21/2 cups
1 cup of vegetables counts as

? 1 cup raw or cooked vegetables; or
? 2 cups leafy salad greens; or
? 1 cup 100% vegetable juice.

6-ounce equivalents
1 ounce of grains counts as

? 1 slice bread; or
? 1 ounce ready-to-eat cereal; or
? 1/2 cup cooked rice, pasta, or cereal.

5-ounce equivalents
1 ounce of protein foods counts as

? 1 ounce seafood, lean meats, or poultry; or
? 1 egg; or
? 1 Tbsp peanut butter; or
? 1/4 cup cooked beans, peas, or lentils; or
? 1/2 ounce unsalted nuts or seeds.

3 cups
1 cup of dairy counts as

? 1 cup dairy milk or yogurt; or
? 1 cup lactose-free dairy milk or yogurt; or
? 1 cup fortified soy milk or yogurt; or
? 11/2 ounces hard cheese.

Fruits

Vegetables

Grains

Protein

Dairy

Did you reach
your target?

Limit Limit:
? Added sugars to <45 grams a day.
? Saturated fat to <20 grams a day.
? Sodium to <2,300 milligrams a day.

Activity
Be active your way:
Children 6 to 17 years old should
move 60 minutes every day. Adults
should be physically active at least
21/2 hours per week.

Y

N

Y

N

Y

N

Y

N

Y

N

Y N

* This 1,800-calorie pattern is only an estimate of
your needs. Monitor your body weight and adjust
your calories if needed.

Y N

DietaryGuidelines.gov

FNS-904-24
July 2021

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender.

PERSONAL DIET ANALYSIS 2

Personal Diet Analysis

2/11/2022

Introduction

Nutrition is the basis of human survival. It sustains human beings by ensuring they are endlessly supplied with energy and nutrients necessary for growth and development. For instance, one needs to take body-building food such as proteins for tissues to mature and develop. However, nutrition needs to be good to ensure the above benefits. Poor nutrition, including lack of adequate food and an unbalanced diet, causes disease outbreaks and other body failures. From the explanation, it is evident that nutrition is essential for human survival. People’s well-being and conduct are greatly influenced by the foods they eat. That is as well important for dental health.

Food Group Serving Amounts

From vegetable class, I take at least a plate of vegetable salad each day with an additional cup of low-fat milk, especially after breakfast, from the dairy group. Additionally, I take chicken twice a week during midday meals from the meat group. Unfortunately, I do not take fruits frequently. That calls for the alert to start consuming them at least once daily. However, I take reasonable amounts of water daily. White rice never misses in my meals, at least once a day. Despite that, my intake of seafood, especially salmon fillet, is recommendable. Based on MyPlate result, I still need to include grains, fruits, and vegetables in my meals.

Scoring the Sweets

I have made amendments to reduce the intake of cariogenic meals. For instance, I decided to consume chocolate not more than twice a week. I never consume high amounts of fat and sugar food, such as full-sugar soft drinks and biscuits. I am determined to avoid them for my good.

Modifying Diet

I am used to taking white meat. I feel that I should change by replacing chicken with red beef. I plan to switch from white rice to brown rice three times a week. Also, I need to eat fruits, at least once a day, to ensure I gain the necessary vitamins for my body. I also need to add more meals, including vegetables.

Reference

Breda, J., Jewell, J., & Keller, A. (2019). The importance of the world health organization sugar guidelines for dental health and obesity prevention. Caries Research, 53(2), 149-152.

https://www.myplate.gov.

Palmer, C., & Boyd, L. (2016a). Diet and Nutrition in Oral Health (3rd ed.). Pearson.

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