Chat with us, powered by LiveChat spirituality 1. Use APA format and include a cover page - Study Help
  

spirituality

1. Use APA format and include a cover page, citation, and references where needed.

2. Submit a three to five page (excluding the cover page) reflective journaling from Pastor Ann’s presentation. What were your thoughts about the topics presented? How did you feel about it? Note you are expressing both your thoughts and feelings with the specific examples our guest presented.  On a scale of one to five, how would you rate the presentation? 

3. Keep your reflecting journaling interesting.  It should include an introduction, body, and conclusion.

4. Use the book ‘Ministry of Healing’ by E.G. White and one recent article to support what Pastor Ann presented. These two resources may support your views too.  It’s fine if you have more references.  Ensure to cite and reference according to APA style/format. 

EXPLANATION: CAPITALS INDICATE MATTER ADDED TO EXISTING LAW.
[Brackets] indicate matter deleted from existing law.

*hb0050*

HOUSE BILL 50
J1 2lr0879

(PRE–FILED)

By: Delegate Amprey

Requested: October 20, 2021

Introduced and read first time: January 12, 2022

Assigned to: Health and Government Operations

A BILL ENTITLED

AN ACT concerning 1

Public Health – Abortion, Artificial Insemination, and Sterilization – 2

Requirement 3

FOR the purpose of requiring, rather than prohibiting, licensed hospitals, hospital 4

directors, and hospital governing boards to authorize within the hospitals the 5

performance of any medical procedure that results in artificial insemination, 6

sterilization, or termination of pregnancy or to refer to any source for these medical 7

procedures; and generally relating to hospitals and abortions, artificial insemination, 8

and sterilizations. 9

BY repealing and reenacting, with amendments, 10

Article – Health – General 11

Section 20–214 12

Annotated Code of Maryland 13

(2019 Replacement Volume and 2021 Supplement) 14

SECTION 1. BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND, 15

That the Laws of Maryland read as follows: 16

Article – Health – General 17

20–214. 18

(a) (1) A person may not be required to perform or participate in, or refer to 19

any source for, any medical procedure that results in artificial insemination, sterilization, 20

or termination of pregnancy. 21

(2) The refusal of a person to perform or participate in, or refer to a source 22

for, these medical procedures may not be a basis for: 23

2 HOUSE BILL 50

(i) Civil liability to another person; or 1

(ii) Disciplinary or other recriminatory action against the person. 2

(b) [(1)] A licensed hospital, hospital director, or hospital governing board [may 3

not be required] SHALL: 4

[(i)] (1) [To permit] AUTHORIZE, within the hospital, the 5
performance of any medical procedure that results in artificial insemination, sterilization, 6

or termination of pregnancy; or 7

[(ii)] (2) [To refer] REFER to any source for these medical 8
procedures. 9

[(2) The refusal to permit or to refer to a source for these procedures may 10
not be grounds for: 11

(i) Civil liability to another person; or 12

(ii) Disciplinary or other recriminatory action against the person by 13

this State or any person.] 14

(c) (1) The refusal of an individual to submit to or give consent for an abortion 15

or sterilization may not be grounds for loss of any privileges or immunities to which the 16

individual otherwise would be entitled. 17

(2) Submitting to or granting consent for an abortion or sterilization may 18

not be a condition precedent to the receipt of any public benefits. 19

(d) Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, a health care provider, a 20

licensed hospital, a hospital director, or a hospital governing board is not immune from civil 21

damages, if available at law, or from disciplinary or other recriminatory action, if the failure 22

to refer a patient to a source for any medical procedure that results in sterilization or 23

termination of pregnancy would reasonably be determined as: 24

(1) The cause of death or serious physical injury or serious long–lasting 25

injury to the patient; and 26

(2) Otherwise contrary to the standards of medical care. 27

SECTION 2. AND BE IT FURTHER ENACTED, That this Act shall take effect 28

October 1, 2022. 29

Adventist HealthCare, Inc.
Clinical Policy Manual

Termination of Pregnancy

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Effective Date: 12/19 Policy No: AHC CP 167.0

Cross Referenced: AHC CP 63.0 Origin:

Reviewed: 3/1/21 Authority: AHC President/CEO

Revised: 02/20 Page: 1 of 8
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SCOPE: All AHC entities

PURPOSE: To establish the process by which the termination of pregnancy will be reviewed

and/or performed in order that the patient and provider of services are both: 1) acting in a manner

that is permitted by State law, and 2) in compliance with the Seventh-day Adventists Guidelines on

Abortion (see Addendum A, accompanying this policy).

DEFINITIONS:

Abortion: Any action aimed at the termination of a pregnancy already established.

OB/GYN: Obstetrics and Gynecology

POLICY:

1. Adventist HealthCare (AHC) strives to meet the physical, mental, and spiritual needs of all its
patients. Activities in all AHC medical facilities are to be conducted in a manner consistent with

biblical principles and the ethics, guidelines, and philosophy of the Seventh-day Adventist

Church.

2. Adventist HealthCare does not condone abortions for reasons of birth control, gender selection
or convenience. Exceptional circumstances will be considered when they present significant

threats to the pregnant woman’s life, serious jeopardy to her health, and severe congenital

defects or conditions carefully diagnosed in the fetus that will most likely result in neonatal

demise or survival with no or minimal potential for viability.

3. Adventist HealthCare is committed to providing total health care, which includes the integration
of the physical, mental and spiritual aspects of every person throughout all stages of life.

Adventist HealthCare will administer this policy with great compassion, in a non-judgmental

way.

4. It is the philosophy of Adventist HealthCare that the performance of termination of pregnancies
must be well controlled to ensure that the practice follows the Seventh-day Adventist

Guidelines on Abortion.

5. An ad hoc Ethics Review Committee (convened and concluded within 72 hours of notification)
comprised of the Chair of the entity Ethics Committee (or designee), the Spiritual Care member

of the Ethic Committee (or designee), and the Department Chair of OB/GYN (or designee),

must communicate (in person or via phone call), review and approve (except conditions in

Addendum B) each case to verify compliance with at least one of the following criteria:

a. The continuation of pregnancy would substantially impact the physical health of the mother;
or

b. Severe congenital defects or conditions carefully diagnosed in the fetus that will most likely
result in neonatal demise or survival with no or minimal potential for viability.

6. The deliberations and recommendations of the ad hoc Ethics Review Committee will be
reported to the entity Ethics Committee, which will maintain a record of these deliberations.

Adventist HealthCare, Inc.
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Termination of Pregnancy

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Effective Date: 12/19 Policy No: AHC CP 167.0

Cross Referenced: AHC CP 63.0 Origin:

Reviewed: 3/1/21 Authority: AHC President/CEO

Revised: 02/20 Page: 2 of 8
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7. No one may be forced to administer any inducing agent or perform or participate in a
termination of pregnancy.

8. The Hospital maintains the right to amend policies pertinent to voluntary interruptions of
pregnancy when indicated by change in Federal or State laws, the needs of our patients and

physicians, or policies of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

9. While no physician or practitioner is required to perform or assist in the termination of a
pregnancy, prompt referral to another healthcare provider is required if failure to perform the

termination of pregnancy is reasonably likely to be:

a. The cause of death, serious physical or long-lasting injury to the patient, or
b. Contrary to the standards of medical care.

PROCEDURE:

General Requirements:

1. All patients for termination of pregnancy must be counseled by the attending physician
regarding the alternatives to the procedure.

a. The attending physician must provide documentation of the counseling to the Chair of
OB/GYN or Ethics Review Committee and send all documentation to the Chief Medical

Officer for final approval.

b. Consent for Operative, Other Invasive & Non-Invasive Procedures form must also be
signed.

c. For all termination of pregnancy performed at eight (8) weeks or more gestational age, the
attending physician must complete the “Consent for Disposition of Fetus” and “Certificate

of Fetal Death” as required by Maryland statute.

d. Spousal consent for the procedure is not required.
2. Termination of pregnancy may be performed under the following circumstances:

a. Life of the mother is jeopardized
b. Severe congenital defects or conditions that do not confer viability

Termination of Pregnancy for Minors:

1. If a patient seeking an abortion has not attained her 18th birthday, the physician must provide
written notice of the proposed termination of pregnancy to the patient’s parent or guardian by

certified U.S. mail. A copy of the Postal Service receipt and letter must be placed in the

patient’s medical record. Notice is not required in the following circumstances:

a. If the minor is married or already the parent of a child.
b. The minor does not live with a parent or guardian, and a reasonable attempt to notify the

parent or guardian is unsuccessful;

c. If in the physician’s professional judgment:
i. Notice to the parent or guardian may lead to physical or emotional abuse of the minor;
ii. The minor is mature and capable of giving consent for an abortion; or

Adventist HealthCare, Inc.
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Termination of Pregnancy

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Effective Date: 12/19 Policy No: AHC CP 167.0

Cross Referenced: AHC CP 63.0 Origin:

Reviewed: 3/1/21 Authority: AHC President/CEO

Revised: 02/20 Page: 3 of 8
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iii. Notification would not be in the best interest of the minor.
d. The reason(s) for failure to provide notice must be documented in the patient’s medical

record.

2. The physician is prohibited from notifying the parent or guardian if the minor decided not to
have the termination of pregnancy. If notice has already been provided, the physician should

send a subsequent letter immediately advising the parent or guardian of the change in plans.

3. If the parent or guardian accompanies the minor, written notice is not required.
4. The patient’s medical records should contain a written acknowledgement that the

parent/guardian is aware of the procedure to be performed. At a minimum, his/her presence

should be documented in the medical record.

REFERENCES:

Maryland COMAR §20–103. http://mgaleg.maryland.gov/webmga/frmStatutesText.aspx?

article=ghg&section=20-103&ext=html&session=2016RS&tab=subject5

Seventh-day Adventist Statement on the Biblical View of Unborn Life and its Implications for

Abortion. Approved and voted, General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists Executive

Committee, Annual Council, October 18, 2019.

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Termination of Pregnancy

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Effective Date: 12/19 Policy No: AHC CP 167.0

Cross Referenced: AHC CP 63.0 Origin:

Reviewed: 3/1/21 Authority: AHC President/CEO

Revised: 02/20 Page: 4 of 8
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ADDENDUM A

STATEMENT ON THE BIBLICAL VIEW OF UNBORN LIFE

AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR ABORTION

VOTED, To adopt the document, Statement on the Biblical View of Unborn Life and Its

Implications for Abortion, which reads as follows:

Statement on the Biblical View of Unborn Life and Its Implications for Abortion

Human beings are created in the image of God. Part of the gift that God has given us as

humans is procreation, the ability to participate in creation along with the Author of life. This

sacred gift should always be valued and treasured. In God’s original plan every pregnancy

should be the result of the expression of love between a man and a woman committed to each

other in marriage. A pregnancy should be wanted, and each baby should be loved, valued, and

nurtured even before birth. Unfortunately, since the entrance of sin, Satan has made intentional

efforts to mar the image of God by defacing all of God’s gifts—including the gift of procreation.

Consequently, individuals are at times faced with difficult dilemmas and decisions regarding a

pregnancy.

The Seventh-day Adventist Church is committed to the teachings and principles of the

Holy Scriptures which express God’s values on life and provide guidance for prospective

mothers and fathers, medical personnel, churches, and all believers in matters of faith, doctrine,

ethical behavior, and lifestyle. The Church while not being the conscience of individual believers

has the duty to convey the principles and teachings of the Word of God.

This statement affirms the sanctity of life and presents biblical principles bearing on

abortion. As used in this statement, abortion is defined as any action aimed at the termination of

a pregnancy and does not include the spontaneous termination of a pregnancy, known also as a

miscarriage.

Biblical Principles and Teachings Relating to Abortion

As the practice of abortion must be weighed in the light of Scripture, the following

biblical principles and teachings provide guidance for the community of faith and individuals

affected by such difficult choices:

1. God upholds the value and sacredness of human life. Human life is of the greatest

value to God. Having created humanity in His image (Genesis 1:27; 2:7), God has a personal

Adventist HealthCare, Inc.
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Termination of Pregnancy

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Effective Date: 12/19 Policy No: AHC CP 167.0

Cross Referenced: AHC CP 63.0 Origin:

Reviewed: 3/1/21 Authority: AHC President/CEO

Revised: 02/20 Page: 5 of 8
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interest in people. God loves them and communicates with them, and they in turn can love and

communicate with Him.

Life is a gift of God, and God is the Giver of life. In Jesus is life (John 1:4). He has life in

Himself (John 5:26). He is the resurrection and the life (John 11:25; 14:6). He provides abundant

life (John 10:10). Those who have the Son have life (1 John 5:12). He is also the Sustainer of life

(Acts 17:25-28; Colossians 1:17; Hebrews 1:1-3), and the Holy Spirit is described as the Spirit of

life (Romans 8:2). God cares deeply for His creation and especially for humankind.

Furthermore, the importance of human life is made clear by the fact that, after the Fall

(Genesis 3), God “gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish

but have everlasting life” (John 3:16). While God could have abandoned and terminated sinful

humanity, He opted for life. Consequently, Christ’s followers will be raised from the dead and will

live in face-to-face communion with God (John 11:25-26; 1 Thessalonians 4:15-16;

Revelation 21:3). Thus, human life is of inestimable value. This is true for all stages of human

life: the unborn, children of various ages, adolescents, adults, and seniors—independent of

physical, mental, and emotional capacities. It is also true for all humans regardless of sex,

ethnicity, social status, religion, and whatever else may distinguish them. Such an understanding

of the sanctity of life gives inviolable and equal value to each and every human life and requires

it to be treated with the utmost respect and care.

2. God considers the unborn child as human life. Prenatal life is precious in God’s

sight, and the Bible describes God’s knowledge of people before they were conceived. “Your

eyes saw my substance, being yet unformed. And in Your book they all were written, the days

fashioned for me, when as yet there were none of them” (Psalm 139:16). In certain cases, God

directly guided prenatal life. Samson was to “be a Nazirite to God from the womb” (Judges 13:5).

The servant of God is “called from the womb” (Isaiah 49:1, 5). Jeremiah was already

chosen as a prophet before his birth (Jeremiah 1:5), as was Paul (Galatians 1:15), and John the

Baptist was to “be filled with the Holy Spirit, even from his mother’s womb” (Luke 1:15). Of

Jesus the angel Gabriel explained to Mary: “therefore the child to be born will be called holy—

the Son of God” (Luke 1:35). In His Incarnation Jesus Himself experienced the human prenatal

period and was recognized as the Messiah and Son of God soon after His conception (Luke 1:40-

45). The Bible already attributes to the unborn child joy (Luke 1:44) and even rivalry (Genesis

25:21-23). Those not-yet-born have a firm place with God (Job 10:8-12; 31:13-15). Biblical law

shows a strong regard for protecting human life and considers harm to or the loss of a baby or

mother as a result of a violent act a serious issue (Exodus 21:22-23).

3. The will of God regarding human life is expressed in the Ten Commandments and

explained by Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount. The Decalogue was given to God’s covenant

Adventist HealthCare, Inc.
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Termination of Pregnancy

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Effective Date: 12/19 Policy No: AHC CP 167.0

Cross Referenced: AHC CP 63.0 Origin:

Reviewed: 3/1/21 Authority: AHC President/CEO

Revised: 02/20 Page: 6 of 8
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people and the world to guide their lives and protect them. Its commandments are unchanging

truths which should be cherished, respected, and obeyed. The Psalmist praises God’s law (e.g.,

Psalm 119), and Paul calls it holy, righteous, and good (Romans 7:12). The sixth commandment

states: “You shall not kill” (Exodus 20:13), which calls for the preservation of human life. The

principle to preserve life enshrined in the sixth commandment places abortion within its scope.

Jesus reinforced the commandment not to kill in Matthew 5:21-22. Life is protected by God. It is

not measured by individuals’ abilities or their usefulness, but by the value that God’s creation

and sacrificial love has placed on it. Personhood, human value, and salvation are not earned or

merited but graciously granted by God.

4. God is the Owner of life, and human beings are His stewards. Scripture teaches

that God owns everything (Psalm 50:10-12). God has a dual claim on humans. They are His

because He is their Creator and therefore, He owns them (Psalm 139:13-16). They are also His

because He is their Redeemer and has bought them with the highest possible price—His own life

(1 Corinthians 6:19-20). This means that all human beings are stewards of whatever God has

entrusted to them, including their own lives, the lives of their children, and the unborn.

The stewardship of life also includes carrying responsibilities which in some ways limit

their choices (1 Corinthians 9:19-22). Since God is the Giver and Owner of life, human beings

do not have ultimate control over themselves and should seek to preserve life wherever possible.

The principle of the stewardship of life obligates the community of believers to guide, support,

care for, and love those facing decisions about pregnancies.

5. The Bible teaches care for the weak and the vulnerable. God Himself cares for

those who are disadvantaged and oppressed and protects them. He “shows no partiality nor takes

1a bribe. He administers justice for the fatherless and the widow, and loves the stranger, giving

him food and clothing” (Deuteronomy 10:17-18, cf. Psalm 82:3-4; James 1:27). He does not hold

children accountable for the sins of their fathers (Ezekiel 18:20). God expects the same of His

children. They are called to help vulnerable people and ease their lot (Psalm 41:1; 82:3-4; Acts

20:35). Jesus speaks of the least of His brothers (Matthew 25:40), for whom His followers are

responsible, and of the little ones who should not be despised or lost (Matthew 18:10-14). The

very youngest, namely the unborn, should be counted among them.

6. God’s grace promotes life in a world marred by sin and death. It is God’s nature

to protect, preserve, and sustain life. In addition to the providence of God over His creation

(Psalm 103:19; Colossians 1:17; Hebrews 1:3), the Bible acknowledges the wide-ranging,

devastating, and degrading effects of sin on the creation, including on human bodies. In Romans

8:20-24 Paul describes the impact of the Fall as subjecting the creation to futility. Consequently

in rare and extreme cases, human conception may produce pregnancies with fatal prospects

Adventist HealthCare, Inc.
Clinical Policy Manual

Termination of Pregnancy

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Effective Date: 12/19 Policy No: AHC CP 167.0

Cross Referenced: AHC CP 63.0 Origin:

Reviewed: 3/1/21 Authority: AHC President/CEO

Revised: 02/20 Page: 7 of 8
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and/or acute, life-threatening birth anomalies that present individuals and couples with

exceptional dilemmas. Decisions in such cases may be left to the conscience of the individuals

involved and their families. These decisions should be well-informed and guided by the Holy

Spirit and the biblical view of life outlined above. God’s grace promotes and protects life.

Individuals in these challenging situations may come to Him in sincerity and find direction,

comfort, and peace in the Lord.

Implications

The Seventh-day Adventist Church considers abortion out of harmony with God’s plan

for human life. It affects the unborn, the mother, the father, immediate and extended family

members, the church family, and society with long-term consequences for all. Believers aim to

trust God and follow His will for them, knowing He has their best interests in mind.

While not condoning abortion, the Church and its members are called to follow the

example of Jesus, being “full of grace and truth” (John 1:14), to (1) create an atmosphere of true

love and provide grace-filled, biblical pastoral care and loving support to those facing difficult

decisions regarding abortion; (2) enlist the help of well-functioning and committed families and

educate them to provide care for struggling individuals, couples, and families; (3) encourage

church members to open their homes to those in need, including single parents, parentless

children, and adoptive or foster care children; (4) care deeply for and support in various ways

pregnant women who decide to keep their unborn children; and (5) provide emotional and

spiritual support to those who have aborted a child for various reasons or were forced to have an

abortion and may be hurting physically, emotionally, and/or spiritually.

The issue of abortion presents enormous challenges, but it gives individuals and the

Church the opportunity to be what they aspire to be, the fellowship of brothers and sisters, the

community of believers, the family of God, revealing His immeasurable and unfailing love.

Adventist HealthCare, Inc.
Clinical Policy Manual

Termination of Pregnancy

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Effective Date: 12/19 Policy No: AHC CP 167.0

Cross Referenced: AHC CP 63.0 Origin:

Reviewed: 3/1/21 Authority: AHC President/CEO

Revised: 02/20 Page: 8 of 8
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ADDENDUM B

Conditions That Do Not Require an Ethics Review Committee Approval

1. Contact the Chair OB/GYN to get approval for one of these conditions. The Chair of OB/GYN
may seek advice from others prior to approval. Final approval from Chief Medical Officer is

required.

a. Severe Congenital Defects carefully diagnosed in the fetus which are generally accepted as

universally lethal.

b. Maternal co-morbid conditions in which it is generally accepted that the continuation of the

pregnancy would significantly increase the chance of maternal death or substantially

compromise the physical health of the mother.

The Ministry of Healing

Ellen G. White

1905

Copyright © 2017
Ellen G. White Estate, Inc.

Information about this Book

Overview

This eBook is provided by the Ellen G. White Estate. It is included
in the larger free Online Books collection on the Ellen G. White
Estate Web site.

About the Author

Ellen G. White (1827-1915) is considered the most widely translated
American author, her works having been published in more than 160
languages. She wrote more than 100,000 pages on a wide variety of
spiritual and practical topics. Guided by the Holy Spirit, she exalted
Jesus and pointed to the Scriptures as the basis of one’s faith.

Further Links

A Brief Biography of Ellen G. White
About the Ellen G. White Estate

End User License Agreement

The viewing, printing or downloading of this book grants you only
a limited, nonexclusive and nontransferable license for use solely
by you for your own personal use. This license does not permit
republication, distribution, assignment, sublicense, sale, preparation
of derivative works, or other use. Any unauthorized use of this book
terminates the license granted hereby.

Further Information

For more information about the author, publishers, or how you
can support this service, please contact the Ellen G. White Estate
at [email protected] We are thankful for your interest and
feedback and wish you God’s blessing as you read.

i

ii

Preface

The world is sick, and wherever the children of men dwell,
suffering abounds. On every hand there is a seeking for relief.

It is not the Creator’s purpose that mankind shall be weighed
down with a burden of pain, that his activities shall be curtailed by
illness, that his strength wane, and his life be cut short by disease.
But all too frequently the laws established by God to govern the life
are flagrantly transgressed; sin enters the heart, and man loses sight
of his dependence upon God, the source of life and health. Then
follow the penalties of transgression—pain, sickness, death.

To understand the physical laws governing the body and to bring
the life practices into harmony with these laws is a duty of first
importance. There is a need for an understanding of the many
factors contributing to true happiness—a cheerful home, obedience
to the laws of life, proper relationship to one’s fellow men.

When sickness comes, it is essential that we employ the varied
agencies which, in co-operation with nature’s efforts, will build up
the body and restore the health. There is, also, a larger and more
vitally important question—that of our relationship to the Creator
who originally gave man his life, who made every provision for his
continued happiness, and who today is interested in his welfare.

In this volume, the author, a woman of large experience in the
practical affairs of life, and one particularly favored with rare insight
and knowledge, has brought within the reach of every father and
mother, every man and woman, lay and professional, a vast fund
of information on life and its laws, on health and its requisites, on [8]
disease and its remedies, on the sickness of the soul and the healing
balm of Gilead.

The book is written in clear, simple, beautiful language, instruc-
tive to the learner, hopeful to the despondent, cheering to the sick,
and restful to the weary. Through several decades it has conveyed its
helpful message to hundreds of thousands, as it has been issued and
reissued in many lands, in a dozen of the world’s leading languages.

iii

That this work, which presents a better way, revealing to us a
simpler, sweeter life, full of joy and gladness, with room for that
helpful service which “it is more blessed to give than to receive,”
may fully accomplish its mission is the sincere hope of the publishers
and

The Trustees of the Ellen G. White Publications.

Contents
Information about this Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii

The True Medical Missionary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Chapter 1—Our Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Brotherly Love . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Personal Ministry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Chapter 2—Days of Ministry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
“He Shall Gather the Lambs With His Arm” . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Parental Responsibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Five Small Barley Loaves Feed the Multitude. . . . . . . . . . . 27

Chapter 3—With Nature and With God . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Chapter 4—The Touch of Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

“According to His Mercy He Saved Us” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
“Thou Canst Make Me Clean” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
“Ye Shall Find Rest” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Chapter 5—Healing of the Soul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
“Wilt Thou Be Made Whole?” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
“Go, and Sin No More” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
“I Give Unto You Power” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

Chapter 6—Saved to Serve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
“My Praise Shall Be Continually of Thee” . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
“Freely Ye Have Received, Freely Give” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

The Work of the Physician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Chapter 7—The Co-Working of the Divine and the Human . 68

The Source of Healing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
God’s Promises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75

Chapter 8—The Physician, an Educator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Need of Education in Health Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Natural Remedies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Training for Life’s Conflict . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Power of Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
The Physician and the Temperance Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84

Medical Missionaries and their Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Chapter 9—Teaching and Healing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

v

vi The Ministry of Healing

Work of the Disciples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Teaching Health Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
A Broader Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Little Opportunities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Self-Supporting Missionaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

Chapter 10—Helping the Tempted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Saved by Hope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

Chapter 11—Working for the Intemperate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
The Power of the Will . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Disappointments; Dangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

Chapter 12—Help for the Unemployed and the Homeless . 120
God’s Plan for Israel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Industrial Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Consideration for the Poor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Business Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
The City Slums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Missionary Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Hope and Courage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Life’s Best Things . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130

Chapter 13—The Helpless Poor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
The Household of Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Widows and Orphans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
The Aged . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
A Test of Character . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
“Give, and it shall be given unto you” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138

Chapter 14—Ministry to the Rich . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
The Care of the Sick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145

Chapter 15—In the Sickroom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Sunlight, Ventilation, and Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Diet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Duties of Attendants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Visiting the Sick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Institutional Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Chapter 16—Prayer for the Sick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Confession of Sin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152

Chapter 17—The Use of Remedies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Rational Remedies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Rest as a Remedy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158

Contents vii

Chapter 18—Mind Cure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Control of Mind Over Mind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Sympathy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Bible Principles of Cure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
The Healing Promises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Sing Praises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Marah and Elim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Blessed Assurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176

Chapter 19—In Contact With Nature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Health Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183

Chapter 20—General Hygiene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
The Circulation of the Blood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Respiration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Ventilation and Sunlight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185

Chapter 21—Hygiene Among the Israelites . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Prevention of Disease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Cleanliness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Diet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Rejoicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191

Chapter 22—Dress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Independent of Fashion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200

Chapter 23—Diet and Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Selection of Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Preparation of Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Wrong Conditions of Eating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207

Chapter 24—Flesh as Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Reasons for Discarding Flesh Foods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212

Chapter 25—Extremes in Diet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Chapter 26—Stimulants and Narcotics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219

Condiments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Tea and Coffee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
The Tobacco Habit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Intoxicating Drinks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
The Milder Intoxicants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223

Chapter 27—Liquor Traffic and Prohibition . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
The Work of the Liquor Seller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
The Responsibility of the Church . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
License Laws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230

viii The Ministry of Healing

Prohibition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
The Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235

Chapter 28—Ministry of the Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
Life’s Opportunities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239

Chapter 29—The Builders of the Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
Happiness in Unselfish Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245

Chapter 30—Choice and Preparation of the Home . . . . . . . 246
Simplicity in Furnishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
Beautiful Surroundings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249

Chapter 31—The Mother . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Temperance and Self-Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Overwork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Cheerfulness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
The Privilege of Parents in Child Training . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
The Mother’s Opportunity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255

Chapter 32—The Child . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
The Care of Infants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
The Child’s Diet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
The Care of Children in Sickness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
The Study of Physiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261

Chapter 33—Home Influences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
The Father’s Responsibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264

Chapter 34—True Education, a Missionary Training . . . . . 268
Training for Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
A Broad Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
The Work of the School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
Learning by Imparting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272

The Essential Knowledge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
Chapter 35—A True Knowledge of God . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280

Nature Is Not God . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
The Creation of the Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284
Personality of God Revealed in Christ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288
Revealed to the Disciples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
Character of God Revealed in Christ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
The Glory of the Cross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
It Was Christ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
The Knowledge That Works Transformation . . . . . . . . . . 293

Chapter 36—Danger in Speculative Knowledge . . . . . . . . . 295

Contents ix

Pantheistic Theories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
Searching Into Divine Mysteries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297

Chapter 37—The False and the True in Education . . . . . . . 306
Infidel Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
Historical and Theological Lore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
The Classics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
Sensational Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Myths and Fairy Tales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311
Christ’s Teaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313

Chapter 38—The Importance of Seeking True Knowledge 316
The Work That Requires Our Thought . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
The Science to Be Mastered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
No Time to Lose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
The Need of Self-Renunciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
Christ the Fountainhead of True Knowledge . . . . . . . . . . 320

Chapter 39—The Knowledge Received Through God’s Word 322
Clearer Revealings of God . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327
Education in the Life Eternal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328

The Worker’s Need . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
Chapter 40—Help in Daily Living . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330

The Discipline of Trial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
God’s Plans the Best . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
A Lesson From the Life of Moses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
Plans for the Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336
Wages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337
God Will Provide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337

Chapter 41—In Contact With Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340
Consideration for Burden Bearers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340
Forbearance Under Wrong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341

Chapter 42—Development and Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
Force of Character . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
Singleness of Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354

Chapter 43—A Higher Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
In the Mount With God . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357
The Privilege of Prayer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358
The Divine Counselor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360
Consecration; Trust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361
“Abide in Me” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362

x The Ministry of Healing

“This One Thing I Do” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363

The True Medical Missionary [9]

“To preach good tidings unto the meek;… to bind up the
brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening

of the prison to them that are bound; to proclaim the year of
Jehovah’s favor; … to comfort all that mourn.”

Chapter 1—Our Example[17]

Our Lord Jesus Christ came to this world as the unwearied ser-
vant of man’s necessity. He “took our infirmities, and bare our sick-
nesses,” that He might minister to every need of humanity. Matthew
8:17. The burden of disease and wretchedness and sin He came to
remove. It was His mission to bring to men complete restoration;
He came to give them health and peace and perfection of character.

Varied were the circumstances and needs of those who besought
His aid, and none who came to Him went away unhelped. From
Him flowed a stream of healing power, and in body and mind and
soul men were made whole.

The Saviour’s work was not restricted to any time or place. His
compassion knew no limit. On so large a scale did He conduct His
work of healing and teaching that there was no building in Palestine
large enough to receive the multitudes that thronged to Him. On the
green hill slopes of Galilee, in the thoroughfares of travel, by the
seashore, in the synagogues, and in every other place where the sick
could be brought to Him, was to be found His hospital. In every city,[18]
every town, every village, through which He passed, He laid His
hands upon the afflicted ones and healed them. Wherever there were
hearts ready to receive His message, He comforted them with the
assurance of their heavenly Father’s love. All day He ministered to
those who came to Him; in the evening He gave attention to such as
through the day must toil to earn a pittance for the support of their
families.

Jesus carried the awful weight of responsibility for the salvation
of men. He knew that unless there was a decided change in the
principles and purposes of the human race, all would be lost. This
was the burden of His soul, and none could appreciate the weight
that rested upon Him. Through childhood, youth, and manhood
He walked alone. Yet it was heaven to be in His presence. Day
by day He met trials and temptations; day by day He was brought
into contact with evil and witnessed its power upon those whom[19]

12

Our Example 13

He was seeking to bless and to save. Yet He did not fail or become
discouraged.

In all things He brought His wishes into strict abeyance to His
mission. He glorified His life by making everything in it subordinate
to the will of His Father. When in His youth His mother, finding
Him in the school of the rabbis, said, “Son, why hast Thou thus
dealt with us?” He answered,—and His answer is the keynote of His
lifework,—“How is it that ye sought Me? wist ye not that I must be
about My Father’s business?” Luke 2:48, 49.

His life was one of constant self-sacrifice. He had no home in
this world except as the kindness of friends provided for Him as a
wayfarer. He came to live in our behalf the life of the poorest and to
walk and work among the needy and the suffering. Unrecognized
and unhonored, He walked in and out among the people for whom
He had done so much.

He was always patient and cheerful, and the afflicted hailed Him
as a messenger of life and peace. He saw the needs of men and
women, children and youth, and to all He gave the invitation, “Come
unto Me.”

During His ministry, Jesus devoted more time to healing the
sick than to preaching. His miracles testified to the truth of His
words, that He came not to destroy, but to save. Wherever He went,
the tidings of His mercy preceded Him. Where He had passed, the
objects of His compassion were rejoicing in health and making trial
of their new-found powers. Crowds were collecting around them to
hear from their lips the works that the Lord had wrought. His voice
was the first sound that many had ever heard, His name the first word
they had ever spoken, His face the first they had ever looked upon.
Why should they not love Jesus and sound His praise? As He passed
through the towns and cities He was like a vital current, diffusing [20]
life and joy.

“The land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali,
Toward the sea, beyond the Jordan,

Galilee of the nations,
The people that sat in darkness

Saw a great light,

14 The Ministry of Healing

And to them that sat in the region and shadow of death,
To them did light spring up.”

Matthew 4:15, 16, A.R.V.,
margin.

The Saviour made each work of healing an occasion for implant-
ing divine principles in the mind and soul. This was the purpose of
His work. He imparted earthly blessings, that He might incline the
hearts of men to receive the gospel of His grace.

Christ might have occupied the highest place among the teachers
of the Jewish nation, but He preferred rather to take the gospel to
the poor. He went from place to place, that those in the highways
and byways might hear the words of truth. By the sea, on the
mountainside, in the streets of the city, in the synagogue, His voice[21]
was heard explaining the Scriptures. Often He taught in the outer
court of the temple, that the Gentiles might hear His words.

So unlike the explanations of Scripture given by the scribes and
Pharisees was Christ’s teaching, that the attention of the people was
arrested. The rabbis dwelt upon tradition, upon human theory and
speculation. Often that which men had taught and written about the
Scripture was put in place of the Scripture itself. The subject of
Christ’s teaching was the word of God. He met questioners with
a plain, “It is written,” “What saith the Scripture?” “How readest
thou?” At every opportunity when an interest was awakened by
either friend or foe, He presented the word. With clearness and
power He proclaimed the gospel message. His words shed a flood of
light on the teachings of patriarchs and prophets, and the Scriptures
came to men as a new revelation. Never before had His hearers
perceived in the word of God such depth of meaning.[22]

Never was there such an evangelist as Christ. He was the Majesty
of heaven, but He humbled Himself to take our nature, that He might
meet men where they were. To all people, rich and poor, free and
bond, Christ, the Messenger of the covenant, brought the tidings of
salvation. His fame as the Great Healer spread throughout Palestine.
The sick came to the places through which He would pass, that they
might call on Him for help. Hither, too, came many anxious to hear
His words and to receive a touch of His hand. Thus He went from

Our Example 15

city to city, from town to town, preaching the gospel and healing the
sick—the King of glory in the lowly garb of humanity.

He attended the great yearly festivals of the nation, and to the
multitude absorbed in outward ceremony He spoke of heavenly [23]
things, bringing eternity within their view. To all He brought trea-
sures from the storehouse of wisdom. He spoke to them in language
so simple that they could not fail of understanding. By methods
peculiarly His own, He helped all who were in sorrow and affliction.
With tender, courteous grace He ministered to the sin-sick soul,
bringing healing and strength.

The prince of teachers, He sought access to the people by the
pathway of their most familiar associations. He presented the truth
in such a way that ever after it was to His hearers intertwined with
their most hallowed recollections and sympathies. He taught in [24]
a way that made them feel the completeness of His identification
with their interests and happiness. His instruction was so direct,
His illustrations were so appropriate, His words so sympathetic
and cheerful, that His hearers were charmed. The simplicity and
earnestness with which He addressed the needy, hallowed every
word.

What a busy life He led! Day by day He might have been seen
entering the humble abodes of want and sorrow, speaking hope to
the downcast and peace to the distressed. Gracious, tenderhearted,
pitiful, He went about lifting up the bowed-down and comforting
the sorrowful. Wherever He went, He carried blessing.

While He ministered to the poor, Jesus studied also to find ways
of reaching the rich. He sought the acquaintance of the wealthy
and cultured Pharisee, the Jewish nobleman, and the Roman ruler.
He accepted their invitations, attended their feasts, made Himself
familiar with their interests and occupations, that He might gain [25]
access to their hearts, and reveal to them the imperishable riches.

Christ came to this world to show that by receiving power from
on high, man can live an unsullied life. With unwearying patience
and sympathetic helpfulness He met men in their necessities. By the
gentle touch of grace He banished from the soul unrest and doubt,
changing enmity to love, and unbelief to confidence.

He could say to whom He pleased, “Follow Me,” and the one
addressed arose and followed Him. The spell of the world’s enchant-

16 The Ministry of Healing

ment was broken. At the sound of His voice the spirit of greed and
ambition fled from the heart, and men arose, emancipated, to follow
the Saviour.

Brotherly Love

Christ recognized no distinction of nationality or rank or creed.
The scribes and Pharisees desired to make a local and a national
benefit of the gifts of heaven and to exclude the rest of God’s family
in the world. But Christ came to break down every wall of partition.
He came to show that His gift of mercy and love is as unconfined as
the air, the light, or the showers of rain that refresh the earth.

The life of Christ established a …

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