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HRMT 44004D – Leadership Development                                                                   

Online Discussion Assignment #3: Leading through Strengths  (Letter Exchange)                                                                   

Graphic Image Source: StrengthsFinder

“When we’re able to put most of our energy into developing our natural       
talents, extra ordinary room for growth exists”   (p.9)   

 

Background: This Online Discussion Assignment is intended to support you as you further explore your understanding of Leadership and how various theories may inform your own individual Leadership Identity.  The discussion will help to inform:

1.Your understanding of Leadership Theory

2. Your Leadership Development Plan, and

3. Your Digital Leadership Story, and

4. Your Leadership Creative Learning ePortfolio.

During the first few weeks of class, we took some time to begin the exploration of our notions of leadership, were introduced to the process of critical thinking, and using our views and the process of critical thinking analyzed the dominant theories of leadership.

Instructions

Discussion #3 will be a letter exchange with your designated writing partners in a private discussion board group. This letter exchange is a personal or reflexive interpretation of contents, “aha moments,” questions, next steps, etc. 

The purpose of this Online Discussion is to provide a space for each of you to reflect upon and begin to analyze the Signature Themes Report. When you discover your greatest talents, you discover your greatest opportunity for strength. One way to identify your talents is for you to pay attention to the moments of greatness.  

1. Upload Your Signature Theme report to the StrengthsFinder Assessment dropbox as a part of completing the assignment. Discussions that do not have a report will receive a grade of zero. i.e. No report=0

2.  In your letter exchange reflect on and answer the following: 

a. What Domain or Domains did your themes fall? [Executing, Influencing, Relationship Building or Strategic Thinking]

b. What are your top five Signature Themes (explain)? How might you apply your top 5 themes (strengths) into your emerging leadership identity?

c.  What is your favorite talent theme from their Signature Theme report? How might you leverage this theme (strengths), and your understanding of it, in a leadership context?

d. What is one word or phrase from that theme definition that best describes you?

e. Does anything in the report surprise you? 

f. What is your first reaction to these themes (strengths)? What do they mean to you at this point?

g.  Explore the “shadow” side, or “blind spot” of one (1) of your top 5 themes (strengths) as they relate to leadership. i)Has there been a time when the application of your strength was misunderstood/misinterpreted? ii) If so, what happened? iii) How did you feel? iv) How did others respond? v)What might you need to be mindful of as you seek to develop and leverage your strengths in a leadership context in the future?

Note: Assignment Questions adapted from “StrengthsFinder – Strengths Insight and Action Planning Guide”

Assignment Details and Outline

· Use relevant leadership theories discussed in class to support your answers.

· Use of APA 7th formatting is required for any sources you include. Please refer to the file below for the format using the APA 7th guide as an example. To cite the StrengthsFinder Assessment see:   
Citation for test scales and inventories

· The use of personal pronouns is acceptable.

· Allow adequate time to reply if a reply to your colleagues post.

· This one posting should be between 300-500 words and is conversational in tone.

· Address your writing partners in their posting.

· Participants are not required to post replies to their writing partners in the Discussion thread (SLATE Discussion Board).

Assessment for Online Discussion #3

Your participation in Online Discussion 3 will be assessed in the following manner:

1. Your critical analysis of your StrengthsFinder report.

2. The level, and quality, of your participation during the Online Discussion. At a minimum, you are to respond to, and engage in dialogue, with two of your peers.

3. Your online etiquette demonstrated by the way in which you engage with your peers, the way in which you ask questions, and/or clarify statements.

Online Discussion Rubric

 

Assessment Criteria

Unsatisfactory = 0

Novice = 1

Progressing = 2

Proficient = 3

Score (Max 3)

Critical Analysis of your emerging definition of Leadership

Discussion posting shows little or no evidence that an analysis of the leadership theories explored and/or one’s emerging definition of leadership.  No links included to readings or emerging understanding of leadership. Posting is vague and does not include supporting materials, links to concepts from readings, in-class discussions, outside resources, or specific real-life application

Discussion posting repeats and summarizes the necessary information found in the readings. Few links to concepts from readings, in-class discussions, outside resources, or specific real-life applications are provided. Minimal analysis of findings as it relates to leadership contexts indicating a limited emerging understanding of leadership. 

Discussion posting displays an understanding of the leadership theories evidenced by an analysis of the findings related to one’s own experiences with leadership in different contexts. Links made to concepts from readings, in-class discussions, outside resources, or specific real-life applications. Displays correct use of terminology. Posting explores connections between and among theories and experiences

 

Discussion posting displays an excellent understanding of the leadership theories explored and their respective links to the emerging understanding of self as leader and leadership definition.  The correct terminology is used. Posting integrates readings, in-class discussion, and real-life application. Discussion utilizes well-sourced resources to support assertions made. 

 

APA References/Citation

No Sources Cited

APA formatting may not be used, or it contains many errors.

Some Sources Cited

APA formatting is used but contains many errors.

Most Sources Cited.

APA formatting is used but may contain minor errors.

All sources cited.

 

APA formatting is correct and error-free.

 

Participation in the Learning Community

Discussion posting does not contribute to the ongoing conversation. Limited to no responses/questions posed/posted to peers. Questions that are posted do not generate deeper thinking of others. No evidence of critical thought in replies to questions.

Discussion posting sometimes contributes to the ongoing conversation, as evidenced by affirming statements or references to readings or asking relevant, probing questions. Some responses/questions posed/posted to peers. Questions generate some additional thinking; however, probes to hidden assumptions not evident. 

Discussion posting contributes to ongoing conversation evidenced by affirming statements or references to readings, asking relevant, probing questions. Assumptions are questioned/clarified by proposing alternative point of view

Discussion posting actively stimulates and sustains further discussion and deep thinking by building on peer’s postings or responses, including, but not limited to, building a focused argument around an issue, asking a new related question, challenging assumptions by providing an alternative point of view.

 

Etiquette in Dialogue and Quality of Writing

Posts on the discussion board show disrespect for the viewpoints of others. Posts contain numerous grammatical, spelling, and punctuation errors. Personal and authentic voice not present

No sources are cited

Some posts on the discussion board show respect and interest in the viewpoints of others. Posts include some grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. Emerging authentic voice evident. Some sources not cited

Posts on the discussion board show respect and interest in the viewpoints of others. Posts are mostly free of grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors. The language used demonstrates an authentic voice. Most sources cited.

Posts on the discussion board show respect and sensitivity to peers’ opinions and ideas. Engages with a sense of curiosity rather than a space of “knowing.” Posts are free of grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. All sources cited

 

Discussion Engagement 

Did not respond to peer’s postings.

Responded in a meaningful conversation with one (1) classmates’ post.

The engagement was somewhat active; some questions/responses posted to peers.

Responded in a meaningful conversation with at least two (2) classmates’ posts. The engagement was somewhat active; some questions/responses posted to peers.

Responded in a meaningful conversation with at least two (2) classmates’ posts. Active engagement with questions/responses posted to peers.

 

Total Score

 

 

 

 

 Out of 15

REPORT

LEADERSHIP

Copyright © 2012 Multi-Health Systems Inc. All rights reserved.

AYA MAHMOOD YOUNUS

Your EQ-i Results
Sheridan College HRMT44004D

February 17, 2022

Copyright © 2012 Multi-Health Systems Inc. All rights reserved.

Low Range Mid Range High Range

Introduction
Understanding Your Report

Welcome to a new way of examining your emotional intelligence (EI) skills! You will find this report has many
unique features linking EI and leadership development. These features provide you with a snapshot of how your EI
compares to that of other leaders and insight into your leadership strengths and potential areas for development.
This report examines your results on the EQ-i 2.0 through four key dimensions of leadership:

These leadership dimensions were identified from research conducted on 220 leaders who took the same assessment
you did (the EQ-i 2.0) and who also responded to a leadership assessment measuring performance across these
four areas of leadership. These leaders held positions of mid-level management through to C-suite leadership roles
and were from a variety of industries (e.g., healthcare, technology, financial services, and construction) across North
America. The majority of leaders were working in large organizations (over 400 employees).

As a group, the leaders had significantly higher EI than the general population. In fact, the average Total EI score for
leaders was 14 points higher than that of the general population.

While this leadership sample is a valuable comparison group, it also helped organize the EQ-i 2.0 subscales (page 4)
according to the four leadership dimensions to which they were most strongly connected. Particular subscales were
associated with stronger performance in these four leadership areas (page 6).

Emotional Intelligence and Leadership
How is EI linked to leadership? In addition to the research supporting this report, fifteen years of research has
shown that leaders tend to score higher in EI than the general population. Also, many professionals find it easier
to focus on improving a few specific skills that underlie broader leadership competencies, making the EQ-i 2.0
subscales the perfect building blocks to reaching your leadership potential.

Getting the Most out of Your Report
Keep the following tips in mind as you work through your Leadership Report:

1. No one knows your role like you do. Although this report offers insight into how your EQ-i 2.0 results can
help strengthen your leadership skills, the value of the report is enhanced by framing it within your own
individual context. Integrate your wealth of knowledge about your organization, its culture, and the specifics
of your leadership with the information in this report to derive the most value from it.

2. Take notes as you read the report. Choose strategies for development that you wish to try in your role.

3. All EQ-i 2.0 subscales are related to leadership behaviors, but selecting the right areas to focus on is key
to development. Work with your coach or administrator to determine which subscales will help drive the
leadership results you are looking for. You can treat subscales as building blocks that strengthen broader
leadership skills like mentoring, communication, or conflict resolution.

Leadership Bar
The gold bar positioned on the top of your graph
is the Leadership Bar. This bar represents the range
of scores of the top leaders (those whose EQ-i 2.0
scores were in the top 50% of the leader sample).
Using this bar you can compare your results on the
EQ-i 2.0 to those exceptional leaders who demonstrate
high EI. If your score falls near the bottom of the leadership
bar, then your EI skills need further development in order to be on par with top leaders. If your score falls near the
top of the leadership bar, then your EI skills are as strong as those of top leaders.

Authenticity Coaching Insight Innovation

An authentic leader
serves as a role model
for moral and fair
behavior. A transparent
approach commands
esteem and confidence
from employees.

A leader who coaches
effectively is seen as a
mentor who supports
employee growth.
Employees are nurtured
towards achieving
their highest levels of
performance.

A leader provides
insight by sharing a
purpose and hopeful
vision for colleagues to
follow. Employees are
compelled and inspired
to exceed goals.

An innovative leader
focuses on taking risks,
spurring colleagues’
ingenuity and
autonomous thought.
Knowledge is valued and
challenges are viewed as
learning opportunities.

Name: AYA MAHMOOD YOUNUS

2222 54321-2.054321-2.054321-2.054321-2.0

Copyright © 2012 Multi-Health Systems Inc. All rights reserved.

Highest 3 Subscales

Lowest 3 Subscales

Total EI

Executive Summary

Compared to your other scores, these three subscales might be areas you could further leverage. The corresponding
subscale pages may provide insight.

Compared to your other scores, these three subscales might be areas you could develop. The corresponding subscale
pages will provide you with Strategies for Action.

Name: AYA MAHMOOD YOUNUS

70

70

70

90

90

90

100

100

100

110

110

110

130

130

130

Low Range

Low Range

Low Range

Mid Range

Mid Range

Mid Range

High Range

High Range

High Range

Reality Testing (130)

You likely employ a very realistic and grounded leadership style, turning
to data and facts for making decisions and setting directions for your
team. Be careful not to be too realistic that creativity is stifled. Your
result on this subscale is not only above average but it also falls within
the leadership bar.

Emotional Self-Awareness (126)
You have a strong awareness of the full spectrum of emotions and their
triggers. This allows you to carefully sift through emotions and handle
high-pressure situations well. Your result on this subscale is not only
above average but it also falls within the leadership bar.

Empathy (124)
Empathy is likely a very natural and inherent skill for you, which you use
to show compassion and respect for the people you lead. Your result on
this subscale is not only above average but it also falls within the
leadership bar.

Emotional Expression (58)
In general, you tend not to share your emotions. Becoming more
expressive will allow you to be a more inspirational leader who is able to
share a compelling vision. Your result on this subscale falls below the
leadership bar.

Independence (70)
You are likely more reliant than you should be on your team’s
reassurance and approval of your decisions. Improvement in this area
will benefit you when objective and difficult decisions need to be made.
Your result on this subscale falls below the leadership bar.

Flexibility (71)
You tend to stick to tried and true methods, both in your leadership
approach and the directions you set for your team. They are likely
lacking the inspiration they need from you for innovation and progress.
Your result on this subscale falls below the leadership bar.

94

3333 54321-2.054321-2.054321-2.054321-2.0

Copyright © 2012 Multi-Health Systems Inc. All rights reserved.

SELF-PERCEPTION

Self-Regard is respecting oneself while understanding and
accepting one’s strengths and weaknesses. Self-Regard is often
associated with feelings of inner strength and self-confidence.
Self-Actualization is the willingness to persistently try to
improve oneself and engage in the pursuit of personally relevant
and meaningful objectives that lead to a rich and enjoyable life.
Emotional Self-Awareness includes recognizing and
understanding one’s own emotions. This includes the ability to
differentiate between subtleties in one’s own emotions while
understanding the cause of these emotions and the impact they
have on one’s own thoughts and actions and those of others.

SELF-EXPRESSION

Emotional Expression
is openly expressing
one’s feelings verbally
and non-verbally.
Assertiveness
involves communicating
feelings, beliefs and thoughts
openly, and defending
personal rights and values
in a socially acceptable,
non-offensive, and
non-destructive manner.
Independence is the ability
to be self directed and free
from emotional dependency
on others. Decision-making,
planning, and daily tasks are
completed autonomously.

P
E

R
F

O
R

M
A

N
C

E

EM
OT

ION
AL & S

OCIAL FUNCTIONING

P
E

R
F

O
R

M
A

N
C

E

EMOTION AL & SOCIAL FUN
C TI

ON
IN

G

W
E

L
L

– B
E
IN

G

W

ELL -B
E

IN
G

W
E

L
L -B

E
IN

G

W
E
LL

– B
E

IN
G

Emotional
Intelligence

M
A
N
A
GE

M
EN

T

ST
R
ES
S

SELF-EX
PR

ES
S
IO
N

SELF-P
ERCEPTION

M
AKING

DECISION

INTER
PER

SO

NA
L

O
p

ti
m

is
m

S
tr

es
s

To
le

ra
nc

e

Fl
ex

ib
ili

ty

M
A
N
A
GE

M
EN

T

ST
R
ES
S

Proble m

Solving

Reality Testing

Im
pulse ControlMAKING

DECISION

Inte
rpe

rs

on
al

Rela
tio

ns

hi
ps

Em
pa

th

y

Socia
l Re

sp
on

si
bi

lit
y

INTER
PER

SO

NA
L

Independen
ce

Assertiven
ess

Em
otional Exp

ression
SELF-EX

PR
ES

S
IO
N

Sel
f-Awareness
Emotional

Self-
Actualization

Self-Regard

SELF-P
ERCEPTION

Copyright © 2011 Multi-Health Systems Inc. All rights reserved.
Based on the original BarOn EQ-i authored by Reuven Bar-On, copyright 1997.

STRESS MANAGEMENT

Flexibility is adapting
emotions, thoughts and
behaviors to unfamiliar,
unpredictable, and dynamic
circumstances or ideas.
Stress Tolerance
involves coping with
stressful or difficult
situations and believing
that one can manage or
influence situations in a
positive manner.
Optimism is an indicator
of one’s positive attitude
and outlook on life. It involves
remaining hopeful and resilient,
despite occasional setbacks.

DECISION MAKING

Problem Solving is the ability to find
solutions to problems in situations where
emotions are involved. Problem solving
includes the ability to understand
how emotions impact decision making.
Reality Testing is the capacity to
remain objective by seeing things as
they really are. This capacity involves
recognizing when emotions or personal
bias can cause one to be less objective.
Impulse Control is the ability to resist
or delay an impulse, drive or temptation
to act and involves avoiding rash
behaviors and decision making.

INTERPERSONAL

Interpersonal Relationships refers
to the skill of developing and maintaining
mutually satisfying relationships that are
characterized by trust and compassion.
Empathy is recognizing, understanding,
and appreciating how other people
feel. Empathy involves being able to
articulate your understanding of another’s
perspective and behaving in a way that
respects others’ feelings.
Social Responsibility is willingly
contributing to society, to one’s social
groups, and generally to the welfare of
others. Social Responsibility involves
acting responsibly, having social
consciousness, and showing concern
for the greater community.

EQ-i 2.0 Model of Emotional Intelligence

Name: AYA MAHMOOD YOUNUS

4444 54321-2.054321-2.054321-2.054321-2.0

Copyright © 2012 Multi-Health Systems Inc. All rights reserved.

Self-Perception Composite

Self-Regard
Respecting oneself; Confidence

Self-Actualization
Pursuit of meaning; Self-improvement

Emotional Self-Awareness
Understanding own emotions

Self-Expression Composite

Emotional Expression
Constructive expression of emotions

Assertiveness
Communicating feelings, beliefs; Non-offensive

Independence
Self-directed; Free from emotional dependency

Stress Management Composite

Flexibility
Adapting emotions, thoughts and behaviors

Stress Tolerance
Coping with stressful situations

Optimism
Positive attitude and outlook on life

Interpersonal Composite

Interpersonal Relationships
Mutually satisfying relationships

Empathy
Understanding, appreciating how others feel

Social Responsibility
Social conciousness; Helpful

Decision Making Composite

Problem Solving
Find solutions when emotions are involved

Reality Testing
Objective; See things as they really are

Impulse Control
Resist or delay impulse to act

Overview
Total EI

Name: AYA MAHMOOD YOUNUS

70

70

70

90

90

90

100

100

100

110

110

110

130

130

130

Low Range

Low Range

Mid Range

Mid Range

High Range

High Range

94

116

123

96

126

59

58

86

70

107

94

124

96

107

86

130

103

86

71

97

98

5555 54321-2.054321-2.054321-2.054321-2.0

Copyright © 2012 Multi-Health Systems Inc. All rights reserved.

The EQ-i 2.0 subscales are strongly related to leadership competencies that in turn may be associated with productivity,
decreased employee turnover, and increased efficiency. A leader who embodies the competencies below is more likely to
increase work satisfaction, create trust, and foster organizational commitment and loyalty.

This page provides you with a leadership lens through which to view your EQ-i 2.0 results. There are four general
competencies required of most leaders: authenticity, coaching, insight and innovation. The top six EQ-i 2.0 subscales (based
on theory and research) that are associated with each competency are displayed below. High scores on the associated
subscales help ensure optimal functioning in the competency area. Alternatively, if you score lower on a few subscales
for a particular leadership competency, you can quickly see that this might be an area of challenge for you in your current
leadership role. Focusing development efforts in these areas are likely to yield the greatest return in your growth as a leader.

Authenticity
An authentic leader serves as a role model
for moral and fair behavior. A transparent
approach commands esteem and confidence
from employees.

Self-Actualization

Reality Testing

Self-Regard

Emotional Self-Awareness

Social Responsibility

Independence

Insight
A leader provides insight by sharing a purpose and
hopeful vision for colleagues to follow. Employees are
compelled and inspired to exceed goals.

Self-Actualization

Optimism

Self-Regard

Social Responsibility

Interpersonal Relationships

Emotional Expression

Coaching
A leader who coaches effectively is seen as a
mentor who supports employee growth. Employees
are nurtured towards achieving their highest levels
of performance.

Self-Actualization

Empathy

Reality Testing

Interpersonal Relationships

Assertiveness

Emotional Self-Awareness

Innovation
An innovative leader focuses on taking risks,
spurring colleagues’ ingenuity and autonomous
thought. Knowledge is valued and challenges are
viewed as learning opportunities.

Self-Actualization

Independence

Problem Solving

Assertiveness

Flexibility

Optimism

Impulse Control

Stress Tolerance

Problem Solving

Independence

Leadership Potential

Leadership Derailers Omitted
Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Omitted

Name: AYA MAHMOOD YOUNUS

123

123

96 96

96 96

126

126

58

86

86

70

70

70

94

94

124

96

96

86

86

130

130

103

71

97

98

98

AYA MAHMOOD, you may be at a higher risk of derailmenthigher risk of derailmenthigher risk of derailmenthigher risk of derailment as you received a
lower result in Independence and Problem Solving and a moderate result in
Stress Tolerance. Lower scores on any of the four subscales are associated
with adopting a more passive or avoidant leadership style. Your team may see
you as being ineffective in certain situations and may not be fully satisfied
under your leadership. You would benefit from strengthening any lower
scoring subscales and be especially cognizant of any scores below 90.

6666 54321-2.054321-2.054321-2.054321-2.0

Copyright © 2012 Multi-Health Systems Inc. All rights reserved.

What Your Score Means

Self-Regard
Respecting oneself; confidence

Balancing Your EI

Leadership Impact Strategies for Action

Name: AYA MAHMOOD YOUNUS

70 90 100 110 130

Low Range Mid Range High Range

123

Leaders with self-regard respect themselves and accept both personal strengths and limitations while remaining satisfied and self-
secure. AYA MAHMOOD, your result suggests that your self-regard is stronger than most people’s. You are likely seen as a self-
confident leader who understands both personal strengths and weaknesses. It is important to ground your self-assuredness by using
your reality testing skills and by continually seeking feedback. You may:

■ Exercise your considerable influence on key, strategic decisions.
■ Demonstrate courage to stick by your convictions even in the face of dissenting viewpoints.
■ Use a leadership approach that leverages your strengths and delegates tasks in your weaker areas.
■ Want to ensure that your perception of your strengths is supported by objective evidence, otherwise you run the risk of being seen

as overconfident in your abilities.

You scored well above average on Self-Regard and fall within the leadership bar.

Leadership Implications.Leadership Implications.Leadership Implications.Leadership Implications. Your result may mean that you are
driven to surpass organizational targets, create an atmosphere of
excellence and demonstrate a strong sense of confidence in your
leadership capabilities. The challenge is that you could lose touch
with a realistic appraisal of your capabilities. It is important to
draw on reality testing behaviors and feedback from your team to
maintain a healthy self-perception.

Organizational Implications.Organizational Implications.Organizational Implications.Organizational Implications. Your ability to understand and accept
your strengths and weaknesses is likely perceived as a genuine
approach to leadership. Your higher confidence can probably be
seen across department lines, as you feel assured that you can
help out in a variety of capacities. You likely serve as a role
model, and your higher expectations of yourself and your
employees may lead to better quality decisions and greater
productivity. Use external validation to avoid any attempts at self-
aggrandizement and to maintain a realistic appraisal of your
talents.

Be Mindful of Your Weaknesses.Be Mindful of Your Weaknesses.Be Mindful of Your Weaknesses.Be Mindful of Your Weaknesses. Awareness of your shortcomings
helps to circumvent an inflated self-concept and temper this
exaggerated self-image.

■ Nobody’s perfect; our flaws make us human. The key is to be
cognizant of your limitations and ensure that they do not
impinge on organizational performance.

■ Develop strategies to improve your limitations. For example, if
you are impatient and anxious when deadlines are not met in
a timely fashion, you may want to refocus and practice
relaxation techniques (e.g., deep breathing).

■ You are only limited by the power of your imagination.
Awareness leads to action and meaningful change. Be
mindful that change does not occur overnight, but with
persistence, transformation is possible.

Modesty is the Best Policy.Modesty is the Best Policy.Modesty is the Best Policy.Modesty is the Best Policy. While it is important to feel good
about your strengths, do not overinflate them.

■ Watch that you don’t fall prey to arrogance; demonstrate
humility and be humble in your approach. Successful leaders
know their worth, but they remain grounded by seeking
feedback from their team as well as from other leaders.

■ Colleagues respect a leader who is visionary and exudes
charisma, but who is also approachable, genuine and can
relate to others. Your modest approach will help you win the
esteem and admiration of your employees.

This section compares Self-Regard with Self-Actualization, Problem Solving, and Reality Testing. The subscale that differs the most
from Self-Regard is Problem Solving. Improving the interplay between these subscales is likely to significantly impact your overall
emotional intelligence.

Self-Regard Problem Solving(86)

Your Self-Regard is higher than your Problem Solving. These components work effectively together when self-confidence promotes the
feeling that you can and will succeed. Therefore, cultivate a feeling of resilience and perseverance to commit to finding required
solutions.

7777 54321-2.054321-2.054321-2.054321-2.0

Copyright © 2012 Multi-Health Systems Inc. All rights reserved.

What Your Score Means

Self-Actualization
Pursuit of meaning; Self-improvement

Leadership Impact Strategies for Action

Balancing Your EI

Name: AYA MAHMOOD YOUNUS

70 90 100 110 130

Low Range Mid Range High Range

96

Self-actualization is strongly related to overall work success and performance. It can be summed up in three words: pursuit of meaning.
While this sounds quite philosophical, as a leader, it means finding purpose and enjoyment in your role and performing to your fullest
potential. AYA MAHMOOD, your result suggests that you operate with a slightly lower sense of accomplishment and resolve than most
leaders. Although you may believe that you can achieve more, your result may mean that:

■ You would benefit from being more actively involved in business objectives.
■ You try to achieve the goals you establish, although you might benefit from setting more challenging ‘stretch goals.’
■ For the most part, you believe you are fulfilling your potential.
■ Occasionally, you help others reach their fullest potential, but you would benefit from making a more concerted effort in their

development.

You scored below the leadership bar on Self-Actualization and could benefit from strengthening skills in this area.

Leadership Implications.Leadership Implications.Leadership Implications.Leadership Implications. You are likely leading people with a
moderate sense of mastery and accomplishment. You usually
motivate your employees to achieve their potential, and you ignite
their ingenuity and resolve to achieve personal and professional
goals. You may benefit from striving even harder to be the best
you can be so that your work and personal life are as meaningful
as possible.

Organizational Implications.Organizational Implications.Organizational Implications.Organizational Implications. You are perceived as a person who is
striving to learn, developing new skills and willing to grow in order
to fully optimize your talents. If strengthened, this quest could
permeate the entire organization, as employees may emulate your
approach. This drive for self-fulfillment may stimulate higher
productivity and greater employee satisfaction. Continue to work
on achieving the zenith of your potential so that employees may
learn from this style.

One Small Step.One Small Step.One Small Step.One Small Step. Transcribing your objectives is a great strategy
to solidify your action plan as you work toward greater self-
actualization.

■ By writing your action plan on paper or sharing it with a
colleague, you solidify your goals. Choose one small strategy
for making your life more enriching and share this with a
colleague or place it in your calendar. Or, is there a way you
can get your whole team involved in adding more meaning to
the workday? Research clearly demonstrates that the
likelihood of successful goal attainment increases by the mere
fact of simply writing down your goals.

Capitalize on Strengths.Capitalize on Strengths.Capitalize on Strengths.Capitalize on Strengths. You are already aware of your passions,
though at times you may not realize it.

■ List tasks in which you excel (e.g., chairing meetings,
producing comprehensive financial reports), and try to
incorporate these activities throughout the workday. If you
feel unsure of your areas of strength, pinpoint pursuits in
which you receive many compliments, or ask your colleagues
for feedback. These activities will reinvigorate your zeal for
work and improve your productivity.

This section compares Self-Actualization with Self-Regard, Optimism, and Reality Testing. The subscale that differs the most from Self-
Actualization is Reality Testing. Improving the interplay between these subscales is likely to significantly impact your overall emotional
intelligence.

Self-Actualization(96) Reality Testing(130)

Your Self-Actualization is lower than your Reality Testing. These components can be balanced by setting realistic plans to accomplish
meaningful experiences that are internally satisfying and not just objectively required. The challenge is to set goals that are attainable
and realistic, but also intrinsically valuable.

8888 54321-2.054321-2.054321-2.054321-2.0

Copyright © 2012 Multi-Health Systems Inc. All rights reserved.

What Your Score Means

Emotional Self-Awareness
Understanding own emotions

Leadership Impact Strategies for Action

Balancing Your EI

Name: AYA MAHMOOD YOUNUS

70 90 100 110 130

Low Range Mid Range High Range

126

If you have a solid understanding of what brings about your emotions, it is much easier to regulate your behavior and control the
impact your emotions have on employees in the organization. AYA MAHMOOD, your result indicates that more than most people, you
are conscious of your emotions and the impact they have on performance. You likely lead with composure and a full understanding of
your impact on others. It is likely that you:

■ Can choose a course of action based on a “gut feeling” in time-constrained situations.
■ Generate respect, admiration, and honesty from employees because you are viewed as highly self-aware.
■ Generally take time to contemplate instead of acting rashly, thereby considering your emotional response and those of others.
■ May overanalyze your emotions and those of your employees, which can impede decision-making and action in the organization.

You scored well above average on Emotional Self-Awareness and fall within the leadership bar.

Leadership Implications.Leadership Implications.Leadership Implications.Leadership Implications. As a leader, you have a thorough grasp
of your emotional triggers and reactions. This in-depth
understanding helps fuel a streamlined decision-making process
as you incorporate your emotions into your role as a leader.
Knowing your emotional triggers and reactions, you are able to
utilize this emotional knowledge to effectively navigate through
challenging or difficult situations.

Organizational Implications.Organizational Implications.Organizational Implications.Organizational Implications. Your capacity to grasp subtle
emotional nuances helps you take calculated risks that help the
organization meet its strategic goals. This comfort with, and
knowledge of, your emotional triggers and reactions allows you to
lead with authenticity and a candid approach to help you gain
credibility and buy-in with employees. You are able to manage
tense and perhaps overwhelming situations with ease, and you
are able to use and recognize your full spectrum of emotions.

Be a Role Model.Be a Role Model.Be a Role Model.Be a Role Model. Through the steadfast control of your emotions,
you can be innovative, successfully take risks, and gain the trust
of your employees.

■ The most prominent leaders have an aptitude for remaining
composed in competitive situations and under mounting
pressure and duress. Your ability to be aware of your
emotions helps you to serve as a model of composure and
ensures that employees feel secure and content to overcome
any potential challenge.

■ Give seminars/workshops or hire an expert to teach
employees about understanding emotions and the impact of
their emotions on others.

Weigh the Evidence.Weigh the Evidence.Weigh the Evidence.Weigh the Evidence. As you are highly adept at understanding
your emotions, you may have a tendency to be overly reliant on
your emotional barometer to make decisions. Be mindful to
incorporate objective evidence.

■ Intuition can only carry you so far. While a deal may feel right,
data may not support the intended strategy. Be sure to seek
counsel from colleagues, involve members of your team and
emphasize facts to support your proposed course of action.

This section compares Emotional Self-Awareness with Reality Testing, Emotional Expression, and Stress Tolerance. The subscale that
differs the most from Emotional Self-Awareness is Emotional Expression. Improving the interplay between these subscales is likely to
significantly impact your overall emotional intelligence.

Emotional Self-Awareness(126) Emotional Expression(58)

Your Emotional Self-Awareness is higher than your Emotional Expression. You may expect others to be aware of how you are feeling,
so make sure you are clearly communicating your feelings to them. Remember, expression is the way you showcase your emotional
knowledge and it will have greater impact if it works in parallel with your awareness.

9999 54321-2.054321-2.054321-2.054321-2.0

Copyright © 2012 Multi-Health Systems Inc. All rights reserved.

What Your Score Means

Emotional Expression
Constructive expression of emotions

Leadership Impact Strategies for Action

Balancing Your EI

Name: AYA MAHMOOD YOUNUS

70 90 100 110 130

Low Range Mid Range High Range

58

Think of Emotional Expression as the action part of the emotional experience. Leaders who effectively express their emotions use
words and physical expressions to convey their feelings in a way that is not hurtful to others. AYA MAHMOOD, your result indicates
you may have difficulty bringing emotions to the surface and sharing your true feelings and opinions with others. Consider the
following, which may be characteristic of you:

■ You don’t feel …

www.va luescentre .com

Personal Values Assessment
Aya

Prepared by Barrett Values Centre
Date: February 16, 2022

Barrett Values Centre’s vision is to create a values driven society. This free assessment will help you become
more aware of your own values and how these values influence your decisions and actions.

www.valuescentre.com BARRETT VALUES CENTRE and SEVEN LEVELS OF CONSCIOUSNESS are registered trademarks of Barrett Values Centre, LLC. 2

Personal Values and Awareness

Our values reflect what is important to us. They are a shorthand way of describing our individual motivations. Together with our beliefs, they are the causal factors that drive our decision-
making.

Barrett Seven Levels of Consciousness Model

Service
Selfless service

Making a Difference
Making a positive difference in the world

Internal Cohesion
Finding meaning in existence

Transformation
Letting go of fears.
The courage to develop and grow

Self Esteem
Feeling a sense of self-worth
Fear: I am not enough

Relationship
Feeling protected and loved
Fear: I am not loved enough

Survival
Satisfying our physical and survival needs
Fear: I do not have enough

Values can be positive or fear-based (limiting). For example, honesty, trust and
accountability are positive values, whereas blame, revenge and manipulation are
potentially limiting, or fear-based, values.

Personal mastery involves overcoming or eliminating our fear-based beliefs. When our
beliefs or behaviours are out of alignment with what is really important to us – our values,
we lack authenticity.

Every human being on the planet grows and develops within seven well defined areas.
These areas are defined in the Barrett Seven Levels of Consciousness Model. Each area
focuses on a particular need that is common to all people. The level of growth and
development of an individual depends on their ability to satisfy these needs.

At different times you may find that you focus more on some levels and less on others, in
response to changing life conditions. It is important to understand that in terms of the
seven areas higher is not better; for example it will be difficult for you to focus on helping
others if you are having health and money problems.

The seven areas in the development and growth of personal awareness are summarised
in this diagram and are described in more detail on page 3.

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Personal Values and Awareness

Common Good

Transformation

Self Interest

Self Interest
The first three areas of awareness – Survival, Relationship and Self-Esteem, focus on our
personal self-interest – satisfying our need for security and safety, our need for love and
belonging, and our need to feel good about ourselves through the development of a sense
of pride in who we are. We feel no sense of lasting satisfaction from being able to meet
these needs, but we feel a sense of anxiety if these needs are not met.

Transformation
The focus of the fourth area of awareness, Transformation, is on letting go of fears.
During this stage in our development, we establish a sense of our own personal authority,
and our own voice. Within the area of Transformation, we choose to live by the values and
beliefs that resonate deeply with who we are.

Common Good
The upper three areas of awareness – Internal Cohesion, Making a Difference and Service
– focus on our need to find meaning and purpose in our lives. We express that meaning by
striving to make our world a better place and by leading a life of selfless service. When
these needs are fulfilled they engender deeper levels of motivation and commitment.
Within these areas, we learn how to develop an inner compass that guides us into making
life affirming decisions.

Personal Mastery
Individuals who focus exclusively on the personal self-interest areas may be influenced
by the fears they hold about satisfying their individual needs. They look for approval or
reassurance from others.

Individuals who focus exclusively on the satisfaction of the upper common good needs
may lack the skills necessary to remain grounded. They can be ineffectual and
impractical when it comes to taking care of their basic needs.The most successful
individuals are those who balance all of the areas. They are trusting of others, are able
to manage complexity, and can respond or adapt to all situations.

In reality people do not operate from any one single area of awareness. They tend to be
clustered around three or four areas. Individuals are usually focused at areas 1 through
5, typically with a specific emphasis on Internal Cohesion, the fifth area, in which we
seek meaning in our lives.

Your Results
On the next page we will show you how the values you chose map against these seven
areas. Positive values will be identified with a blue dot and potentially limiting or fear
based values will be shown as a white dot.

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Aya – Results

7: Selfless service

6: Making a positive difference in the world

5: Finding meaning in existence

4: Letting go of fears.
The courage to develop and grow

3: Feeling a sense of self-worth

2: Feeling protected and loved

1: Satisfying our physical and survival needs

Positive: Potentially Limiting (L):

Area

ambition 3

being liked (L) 2

caring 2

conflict resolution 2

control (L) 1

creativity 5

enthusiasm/ positive attitude 5

humour/ fun 5

listening 2

trust 5

From the values you selected it is clear that:

· You are a person for whom meaning is important. You have a strong set of moral standards which are
important in how you treat others and how you wish to be treated.

· Having close relationships and connections with others is important to you. You need to feel a sense of
love and belonging. If these needs are threatened or not met you will experience anxiety about not
being accepted or not being loved enough.

Your values show:

· Living with a passionate and an upbeat, fun-loving approach are important to you.
· You have high aspirations and seek to improve your circumstances.
· You are protective and considerate of others.
· Utilising your skills and experience to mediate with others allows you to solve issues that arise.
· You are able to think imaginatively and use your skills to produce new ideas.
· You make a conscious effort to hear and consider the opinions of others.
· Building confidence in others and wanting others to feel they can rely on you are key factors in your

interactions.

The type of values you selected indicates that the connections you build with others are most important to
you.

Understanding our values helps us better understand ourselves and why we may act or react in the way that
we do. For example, if someone undermines one of your values it can result in feelings of hurt; you would be
likely to feel upset if your value of “caring” was not being honoured by someone else. Similarly, if you make a
decision which goes against one of your values this may lead you to feel uneasy or unsettled about the
decision, because you are not being true to yourself.

You have selected two values which might be classed as potentially limiting or fear based:

· Being liked: Feeling a need to be liked by others can lead to situations where you compromise your
values to please someone else. It may result in a lack of openness and honesty with others.
· Control: A desire for control may illustrate an underlying fear or lack of trust. It can also indicate a need
for power over others and can inhibit relationships.

To what extent do you think that this affects the decisions you make and how others see you?

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Self-Development

Self-Reflection
Now that you have seen your own results take time to reflect upon these and to think
about what role these values play in your life. Look also to see if there are any areas in
the values chart that have no focus. This can signify either an area that is already
covered, a gap in your awareness, or an area for future development. If you have empty
areas what do you think this means for you? (See Exercise 2 below to support you with
areas you may want to develop.)

The successful mastery of each area of awareness involves two steps: first, becoming
aware of the emergent need, and second developing the skills that are necessary to
satisfy that need.

Learning how to manage our needs is a life-long process. Even when we have learned
how to become the author of our own lives, we will find situations arising where we
discover that we still have fear-based beliefs that keep us anchored in the lower areas of
awareness -situations that frustrate us or cause us to feel anxious and bring up our
fears. It is vitally important, therefore, to develop a deep understanding of yourself and to
learn the skills and techniques that allow you to manage your life and so that you can
find personal fulfilment.

Next Steps
Now that you have seen your results you may find it useful to discuss the results with
your partner, family and friends. It may also be valuable to ask them to complete an
assessment for themselves. This will enable you to share results, which will help you to
understand your relationships better and lead to a deeper understanding of each other’s
needs.

There are also other ways to better understand your values, for example, reading about
self-development, meditation, coaching, asking for feedback and personal reflection.

Working with your values is a life-long process; developing a deep understanding of
yourself, and learning skills and techniques to help you grow, can help you to find
personal fulfilment.

The exercises on the following pages are included to help you start to gain a greater
awareness of your values. The first exercise looks at those values which are most
important to you and helps you see how these values influence your life.

The second exercise is to help you think about where you might want to develop or grow,
and to help you start to become mindful of what you might do in this regard.

www.valuescentre.com BARRETT VALUES CENTRE and SEVEN LEVELS OF CONSCIOUSNESS are registered trademarks of Barrett Values Centre, LLC. 6

Self-Development: Exercise 1

In this exercise you are asked to choose your top three values from the ten you originally chose above and to start to examine why these are so important to you. Completing this will
help you think more about how these values influence your actions and understand why you may respond in a certain way if someone acts in a manner that goes against one of these
values.

From the 10 values chosen above, think
about the three that are most important to
you? Write them in the spaces below.

Why do you believe that this value is
important to you?

Recall a moment in your life when you
really lived this value. What behaviours did
you exhibit that support this value?

How might you react if this value was not
being honoured by others? Describe your
feelings, thoughts and actions.

1.

2.

3.

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Self-Development: Exercise 2

In this second exercise you are asked to think about areas to strengthen or develop, or values you would like to demonstrate more fully in your life. Completing this will allow you to
start to build an action plan to support your self-development.

From your selected values or the values
listed below, choose up to three that you
would like to live more fully.

What behaviours or actions do you already
demonstrate which support this intention?

What could you stop doing to better
support this value?

What could you start doing to help you
demonstrate this value more fully?

1.

2.

3.

accountability
achievement
adaptability
ambition
balance (home/work)
being the best
caring
clarity
coaching/ mentoring
commitment
community involvement

compassion
competence
conflict resolution
continuous learning
courage
creativity
dialogue
ease with uncertainty
efficiency
enthusiasm/ positive attitude
entrepreneurial

environmental awareness
ethics
excellence
fairness
family
financial stability
forgiveness
friendship
future generations
generosity
health

humility
humour/ fun
independence
initiative
integrity
job security
leadership
listening
making a difference
openness
patience

perseverance
personal fulfilment
personal growth
professional growth
recognition
reliability
respect
risk-taking
safety
self-discipline
teamwork

trust
vision
wealth
well-being (physical/
emotional/ mental/ spiritual)
wisdom

www.valuescentre.com BARRETT VALUES CENTRE and SEVEN LEVELS OF CONSCIOUSNESS are registered trademarks of Barrett Values Centre, LLC. 8

Next Steps

If you are interested to learn more about values here are some suggested areas to explore.

Further Resources

The Importance of Values

The Six Modes of Decision-making

Fundamentals of Cultural Transformation

Learn how you can use the measurement of values to improve organisations and leaders:

Home

Example A

To cite a test, scale, or inventory, provide a citation for its supporting literature such as:

One Author

Author Last Name, Initials. (year). Title of the test. Test database name. URL

Two Authors

Author A Last Name, Initials. & Author B Last Name, Initials. (year). Title of the test. Test database name. URL

Parenthetical citation: (Tellegen & Ben-Porath, 2011)

Narrative citation: Tellegen & Ben-Porath (2011)

Reference Citation

Tellegen, A., & Ben-Porath, Y. S. (2011). Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory–2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF): Technical Manual. Pearson.

Example B

Cite the test, scale, or inventory itself only if a manual or other supporting literature is not available to cite; if a manual is available for a test, cite the manual, not the test.

Parenthetical citation: (Project Implicit, n.d.)

Narrative citation: Project Implicit (n.d.)

Reference Citation

Project Implicit. (n.d.). Gender-Science IAT. https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/takeatest.html

————————————————————————————————————————————-Note: Use this citation for the EQi report

Intext: (EQ-i 2.0 leadership report, 2021) 

References

EQ-i 2.0 leadership report. (2021). Multi-Health Systems Inc. https://mhs.com/

Adapted from APA 7th Edition, Pg. 340, Tests, Scales, and Inventories

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